Easing Into Self Discipline

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When we concern ourselves with ourselves, by this I mean concerning ourselves with our way of thinking and our internal reactions before they affect others, we find the route to self-acceptance and self-growth. We learn we can defeat the poor me’s and find ways to overcome those bouts of feeling sorry for ourselves that seem to appear for no reason. By looking inside ourselves, we find that those bouts of poor me appear for a reason and are caused by our programmed negative thinking that we buried like land mines in our mind. Those thoughts that are triggered by seemingly benign happenings, but erode our self-worth just the same. Like a mine sweeper we must diligently find these buried thoughts and remove them. Replacing them with more uplifting self talk.

When we concern ourselves with ourselves we can awaken from within potentials that we had no idea existed within us. One of those potentials that seem to appear from nowhere is self-discipline. We seem to ease into self-discipline, one day it just seems to appear. The reality is, because of small consistent actions, we find that we are disciplining ourselves. It is these little and hardly noticed actions that one by one build self-discipline within ourselves.

We eased into self-discipline when we took our meds as prescribed on day two and then day three and kept on taking them.

We eased into self-disciple when we made and kept our appointments.
We eased into self-discipline we put that “Oh-so-wanted” item back on the shelf and saved up the money to pay cash for it.

We eased into self-discipline when we realized we had done our daily readings, or daily meditations for a year and never missed a day.

We eased into self-discipline when we realized that our self-talk had transformed from the voice of a nasty, abusive parent to the voice of a trusted friend.

We eased into self-discipline when we maintained a healthy sleeping and eating pattern into the second week and beyond.

We ease into self-discipline when we start a simple exercise program and find in a year we are still doing it.

It takes discipline and commitment to do and change all those things. But we can ease into becoming disciplined and build on each accomplishment. If we just do every day what we are supposed to do, with no long term vision or thoughts about the actions we are taking.  We ease into being that self-disciplined person. We find we have become the person who has awakened potentials within ourselves.  We did not plan it; it just seems to happen.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/what-mentally-strong-people-dont-do/201606/18-things-mentally-strong-people-do

Internal Reflection

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Bipolar disorder is a mental illness. So it stands to reason that our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things. Battling bipolar is a totally internal battle, we may be triggered by external things but it is what we do internally before we respond to that trigger that makes the situation a great one or disaster.  Do you know that there is a choice in that statement? There actually is, we can choose to, or not to, do something internally before we respond to that external thing that is triggering us. In the English language we also have two different words we can use depending on whether we do something internally or we do not. If we do something internally, it is called responding. If we do nothing internally, it is called reacting. I always reacted and it never got me anywhere.

What I found really interesting is that in learning to respond the trigger diminished. What I mean by that is; when I go internal to find an appropriate response, the trigger, no matter what it is, disappears while I look inside myself for the response. It is physically impossible to look two places at once. When I focus on the internal, the external disappears. That was a novel discovery for me and turned out to be the key to really managing my bipolar disorder.

By concentrating on my internal communication, before it became external, I learned I could find myself. Through this I learned that I could hear what my body was telling me. It turns out my body is my early warning system. If something is affecting me, my body is the first to react. Stress causes my digestive tract to revolt. Worry increased my blood pressure. In learning to listen to my body I can head off negative influences in the early stages.

By looking internally, I found my mind mostly lied to me and it was my job to root out those lies and replace them with truths.

Our illness causes us to look externally for both cause and cure. Yet internal reflection makes us realize that beyond our medication which created the stability to look inside ourselves, our causes and cures are strictly internal.

Please remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

http://hubpages.com/education/How-to-Discover-Your-Best-Possible-Self

 

 

Opinion, Belief and Conviction

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Last week I started talking about how to maintain mental wellness long term and ended by stating, “it is our thinking that starts our emotional turmoil and our mood swings. If we do not work to change our minds we have nothing with which to deal with any crisis we encounter, but our same old fall back emotional responses that have never worked for us in the past.”  This week I want to examine how our thinking works to defeat us and how we can change our thinking with the help of a good therapist to bring us real change in our lives.

In setting some very ambitious goals for 2016 and reaching many and setting higher goals for 2017, that old familiar feeling of self doubt attacked me. Those statements in my head that persistently, and loudly, say you will never meet those goals, amount to anything, are a perpetual failure, rang around in my mind.

This is where being the most fortunate suffer of bipolar disorder in the world pays off.  I am employed at the same place as my psychiatrist, my GP and my mental health counselors, which means when my mind attacks me, I do not have to wait to talk to someone. I can just knock on their door and if they have a few minutes, I can tell them the issue and they can give me instant feed back. Basically they can tell me what I am telling myself is a load of crap and not to believe it. Besides reinforcing the positive things going on in my life.

That is the essence of therapy, to have an impartial person of skill and training to point out, and have us then challenge the false negative opinions, beliefs and convictions we hold of ourselves, others and the world around us. We then have to follow up by putting positive information into our minds, which surprisingly can be as false as the negative stuff we just removed. The mind knows no difference. We cannot see our own false beliefs, negative or positive, because we believe them even if they are totally false and bear no resemblance to reality. We convince ourselves to believe things to be true. We really have no idea if they are true or not.  It is by what we see, what we hear, and what we experience that we form our opinions on life. Those opinions we form, become our beliefs and then deep our deep convictions of how things work. At the deep conviction stage, it is difficult to root them out.

Luckily I took action at the opinion stage of things and didn’t wait for them to start digging in. I spent two and half years in therapy to dig out my negative convictions about myself, others and the world around me. It was damn hard work. I would prefer never to have to repeat that work.  By catching those negative thoughts at the opinion stage, it was much easier to remove those negative thoughts and replace those thoughts with positive things.

It is by understanding that those deep convictions, or core beliefs, create the prism through which we view life, that we can begin to change. We need a guide to show us which of these deep convictions is helping us or hurting us. This guide can also give is the insight into new ways of looking at things, past, present and future. That guide is our therapist.

The essence of therapy is to have an impartial person of skill and training to point out and have us then challenge the false beliefs, negative opinions,  and convictions we hold of ourselves, others and the world around us. Please see this attached article by Betterhelp.com on how to find an online therapist near you.

https://www.betterhelp.com/advice/therapy/how-do-i-find-a-therapist-near-me/

 

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this week’s Blog by Dr. Giuseppe (Joe) Accardi from Consultinghealth.com.

Psychoanalytic Therapy: Unconscious vs. Subconscious Mind

How to Maintain Mental Wellness Long Term

 

 

 

 

Developing a different mind can be as simple as making the decision to no longer be a victim of our bipolar disorder and become willing to be a victor over it. To stop our illness from running our lives. Decisions can be fleeting things like New Year resolutions that sound good on one day and then in a few days or weeks we are back to the same old, same old. How do we sustain that decision for mental wellness over the long term? That is the conversation of this blog over the coming year. What do we continually feed our minds to keep us from going back to being a victim of our bipolar disorder.

The convectional view is that seems to be that if we learn to take our meds as prescribed, exercise, eat properly and have a proper sleep routine life will be lovely. I do that and no longer believe that this is the secret to managing our bipolar disorder. When a crisis arises in our lives, a relationship breaks up, financial problems show up, you lose a job, what ever crisis happens to you and crisis’ will happen. It is not going to matter that you have been taking your meds, how often you exercise or how good your nutrition is or if you have a good sleep routine. Your mind is going to take over and deal with the crisis in the only way it knows how and that is badly. Unless you have been training your mind to react differently than it always has. We have a mental illness that manifests itself in our emotions, that are expressed as moods. But it is our thinking that starts our emotional turmoil and our mood swings. If we do not work to change our minds we have nothing with which to deal with any crisis we encounter but our same old fall back emotional responses that have never worked for us in the past. Why would we expect them to work for us now?

Proper sleep, taking our meds as prescribed, eating properly and being physically active are important, but none of these are as important as changing our thinking and our go to responses to life when a crisis shows up.

We need to learn to think differently and respond differently to life. This is our most important task. Next week we will examine the role of therapy in this process of changing our thinking.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

http://psychcentral.com/news/2017/01/07/toxic-bosses-bad-for-mental-health-and-work-ethic/114791.html

A Questioning Attitude for 2017

 

Let’s start 2017 with a question, or a series of questions. Let us start the year with a questioning attitude that keeps us questioning our ideas, beliefs and attitudes all year long. Questioning our ideas, beliefs and attitudes leads to change and 2017 is a great year to change ourselves.

When someone speaks of managing bipolar disorder, they speak of eating right and physical exercise. Why are nutrition and exercise spoke of more often than fixing our thinking and feeding our minds things of a positive nature for a mental illness? Is it not our minds that are sick?

Why is the pain that causes many of our bizarre behaviours and addictions never identified as spiritual pain as expressed by our emotions?

Why do so many people think that taking medication is enough to manage bipolar disorder?

This first question is my aim for 2017, to speak out about feeding our minds. Changing our thinking is the most important thing we can do for ourselves. I am not negating proper nutrition and exercise. I just want to put the importance of each in the right order. What we feed our minds with bipolar disorder can be more important than what we feed our bodies. Training our thinking can be far more important than training our muscles. We are dealing with an illness of the mind; we need to concentrate on healing our mind.

There is mounting scientific evidence that developing a strong spiritual self is helpful in dealing with bipolar disorder. It is becoming evident that the pain that drives our bizarre behaviours and many of our addictive ways is spiritual pain as expressed by our emotions. Our emotions are the only way to express pain, be it physical, mental or spiritual. It is impossible for emotions to express pain as emotions are the vehicle of expression, not a location like mind, body and spirit. When people suggest they are expressing emotional pain, they are really expressing spiritual pain.

As we feel pain when we over use our muscles or over tax our minds, we can and do feel spiritual pain. We can also strengthen our spirits, just as we improve our muscles and our knowledge. In strengthening our spirits, we are better able to cope with the ups and downs of our lives.

So many feel that once they find medications that level out their highs and lows and they feel stable that is all they have to do to manage their bipolar disorder. Popping a few pills only gives you a stable platform on which to build. We failed in building the life we wanted because we had no stability. We could play the blame game or be victims of our illness, but in reality our lack of emotional stability stopped us from building anything. Once we have a proper diagnosis and proper medication that gives us some stability we can fully enter the school of life and unlearn all the bad habits that bipolar disorder created in our lives. Replacing them with good habits that allow us to become useful and productive members of society.

Let us make our goal for 2017 mental wellness and becoming useful and productive members of society through constantly questioning our ideas, beliefs and attitudes, replacing those that lead to false ideals with realistic beliefs and attitudes.

 

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

http://psychcentral.com/news/2017/01/01/few-smokers-with-serious-mental-illness-get-help-to-kick-habit/114511.html