Growing Your Inner child Part 4

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. That individuality also applies to the tools and methods used to manage bipolar disorder. When I talk on the things I use to manage my bipolar I am talking about what worked for me. These suggestions are just that suggestions, but they may work for you. Then again they may not. But at least it is somewhere to start.

And that is what we are talking about, somewhere to start towards growing and healing. To resume our connection with our inner selves. That is the dictionary definition of our inner child, “a person’s supposed original or true self, especially when regarded as damaged or concealed by negative childhood experiences.”

It has been scientifically proven that “Individuals with bipolar disorder suffered greater childhood trauma compared to subjects with unipolar disorder and healthy individuals.”

This is wonderful knowledge and knowledge is a key ingredient, but we can really do nothing with that knowledge until we have a proper diagnosis and medications that give us a stable mind with which to deal with this trauma and negative experiences. We also need some sort of guide, a counselor or therapist. to help us change our thinking and challenge our false beliefs.

Then we need to amass the tools and skills that allow us to peel back the layers of life’s bad experiences that buried our authentic self and turned it into that scared, immature inner child/shadow that has held us back.

For me, the first step was changing that angry, demanding, demeaning voice in my head to a loving, caring voice that encourages and never criticizes. I did this through the practice of affirmations.

The next and most important skill we need to learn about is boundaries, what they are and how practice putting boundaries into place in our lives. There are many good books on boundaries and several organizations offer “Boundary” classes.

It is by continuing to amass knowledge, tools and management skills that we come to meet and accept our true selves, thus growing our inner child/shadow to match our adult selves.  

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by:
Laurie Seymour

https://www.positivelypositive.com/2019/03/13/how-questioning-your-beliefs-can-guide-your-life/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+positivelypositive%2Fpositive+%28Positively+Positive%29

Growing Your Inner Child part 3

“Without a solid foundation, you will have trouble creating anything of value” erickaopenheimer.com

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. That individuality also applies to the tools and methods used to manage bipolar disorder. When I talk on the things I use to manage my bipolar I am talking about what worked for me. These suggestions are just that suggestions, but they may work for you. Then again they may not. But at least it is somewhere to start. And that is the real issue, we have no idea where to start on this journey of healing and growing. If you want to grow your inner child to match your adult frame, in other words, connect with your authentic self you need a starting point.

You can do nothing without a proper diagnosis and, more importantly the proper medication, that works for you. The proper diagnosis and proper medication give’s you a stable mind with which to work. The next thing you need is an unbiased observer, today we call them therapists or counsellors. There is one other ingredient and that is knowledge. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. If you don’t know, you can not act.

I am fond of the sailing ship analogy as it portrays in the minds eye you are sailing a magnificent ship across calm waters. A proper diagnosis and proper medications are the fair wind in you sail and your rudder. The therapist or councillor is the dock worker that helps you untie from the dock by helping you change your thinking and challenges your false beliefs.  Connecting with and living as your authentic self becomes your course to your own tropical island.

If you try to sail away on your journey to find your authentic self without the fair wind and rudder, not willing to gain any knowledge and not having the aid of the dock worker, you are just a rudderless ship that is going to hit the rocks again and again.

My own journey of being improperly diagnosed for decades and my unwillingness to listen to anyone; caused me to have that cyclic existence of lose everything, get patched up and set out again, do well for a bit, then lose everything again. This cycle would repeat over and over until the day I was properly diagnosed with Bipolar 1, found meds that worked and spent two years in a therapist’s office. My experience is not that different than many others who have honestly shared their experiences with me. That is why I can say with certainty that even though we are individuals and differ in the presentation and control of our illness to some degree, without a proper diagnosis and proper medication. Coupled with the aid of a good therapist and a willingness to learn about ourselves and our illness. Our journey to connect with our authentic self will be futile.

The good new is we can incorporate all these aspects the day we get our proper diagnosis. It takes time to find meds that work, and you may have to kiss a few frogs before you find a therapist you click with. This takes time but you can set your course towards developing a strong connection with your authentic selves by learning on your own about this illness and how it affects you. To find what works for you in managing your bipolar disorder and just as importantly what doesn’t work. This is all knowledge

Progress is slow at first but as you progress towards your goal of connecting with your authentic self you will find your mental anguish and emotional turmoil will slowly subside.

These are the first things we need to do embark on that journey towards mental wellness, to make our lives “Ducky” even with bipolar disorder.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Becky Wicks on the NewLifeOutlook website.

https://bipolar.newlifeoutlook.com/fatigue-bipolar/?referrer=Newsletter&utm_campaign=NLO-Bipolar-Newsletter&utm_adgroup=Newsletter&keywords=bipolar

Self Care is Like Gardening

Self care is never selfish, self care is a lot like gardening. Gardening can look selfish spending all that time alone in your yard digging, planting and watering.  You could be out with your friends, but you are home getting dirty. That is until you share the produce, the things you have grown, be it a harvest of flowers, fruits or vegetables.  It is then your friends benefit from all your hard work that you have done. Yes, self care is like gardening.

The reason I started this way and used the quote I did is that in all honesty this is the fourth post I have written this week. The other three were totally negative in both tone and subject. When I write as negatively as I have during this past week its time for a little self care, a little weeding in my garden before I lose what I am trying to produce which is, hope. I want to share hope with you. I want to show that with hard work on yourself you can learn to manage this illness of bipolar that we share and have a useful and productive life. I want to show that it is possible to build a helpful support team of both professional and non-professional people that are there for you. 

I want to take you to the garden store of bipolar management and show you the tools you may need and how to use them.  I want to show you how to clean and sharpen those tools after you used them for a while, so they stay sharp. I want to show you the best seeds to plant within yourself and the process with which they grow so you can have that harvest of usefulness.

Self care is about looking at and after yourself. It is about getting the weeds before they get too big and are harder to pull out. I found the weed that was causing the negativity, it is called expectations. I expected different results than I got from an action. I thought I had cleared my garden of expectations, but a small seed snuck in there from somewhere and began to grow. So, I spent the last few days pulling it out before it produced its own seeds. Because if you let just one weed go to seed you will have seven years of weeding to get rid of that weed again.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog from the “WhatsYourGrief” website.