Category Archives: Being Useful and Productive

You have to Find What Works For You

The statement, “You have to find what works for you,” is the most frustratingly true statement of the bipolar battle. This statement speaks to the individuality of bipolar as no other statement can. Only by finding what works for you can you even make the beginning steps towards mental wellness.

Well-meaning people, both professional and non-professional, often say if you do this, or do that, your bipolar will go away. The truth is they can say whatever they like. Today my first response to these statements is, “Thank you for the suggestion.” This may be because no one can tell me what to do. I would like to outgrow that response, but it is still there. The other reason is that as an individual what they are saying may or may not help. I have tried thousands of “guaranteed to work” things in my bipolar battle that did not help at all.

The thing is I did TRY them all. I took those suggestions and tried them.

Some said medication is guaranteed to work. I tried 52 different meds or combinations of meds until I found the one that worked for me.

Some said therapy is guaranteed to work. I tried several therapists and a couple of different therapy styles until I found the therapist and therapy style that worked for me.

Some said meditation is guaranteed to work.  I tried many, many styles of meditation until I found the definition and style of meditation that worked for me.

Some said exercise is guaranteed to work.  I went to the gym and lasted one week. I tried exercising a home, nope. I took my camera and my camcorder and walked in nature, that is what worked for me. I can hike for hours.

Some said diet is guaranteed to work. I tried this diet and that diet, none of them did anything for me. Then I found a group of people who have a weekly potluck and eat healthy most of the time. That is what worked for me. A diet based on friendship and encouragement.

All these things are just suggestions that I tied and tried until I found what worked for me.

Finding what works is kind of like banging your head against a wall until a door you had no idea was there begins to swing open. Suddenly you are on a totally different and unexpected path. Making the statement, “when you step on the way the way appears” truer than you can imagine.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dr. Ellen Alberstson.

Bipolar Makes Us Ego Driven

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. I write about how to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

Having bipolar means a lot of things but understanding having bipolar makes us ego-driven can give us something to watch for and try to correct.

We all think of egotists as those prideful, boastful people and as bipolar sufferers, we have nothing to be prideful or boastful about so we cannot be ego-driven. The truth is our egos explode when we are afraid, feel less than and unworthy. Our ego pops out in subtle ways that make us think that can’t be ego, but it is. Our ego pops out to hide the emotions we feel like a protector in a sick way. Our ego keeps us from learning what normal human emotions really mean and how to handle them so that we can become the person we were meant to be. Our ego does more to separate us from our true self than anything. The fact is anyone connected with their true self has no ego as they don’t need the protection ego provides.

These are the signs you are ego-driven:

Are you afraid to be alone?

Are you defensive?

Are you insecure and doubt yourself?

Are you obsessed with you and your life’s outward appearance?

Are you constantly seeking outside approval?

Are you easily offended by criticism?

Are you arrogant or become arrogant when you feel better than others?

Do you worry about what others think of you?

Do you seek revenge on those that hurt you?

Do you only hang out with like-minded people or people that agree with you?

Do you constantly apologize?

Do you always have to be right or get in the last word?

Do you have to be better than others?

Do you always have to prove yourself?

Do you talk about others (gossiping)?

Do you point out the flaws in others?

Do you bully and intimidate others?

All these manifestations of ego stand in the way of learning to love ourselves and connecting with our true selves.

‘To love yourself, you must be yourself. To be yourself you must believe in yourself.” Ed Mylett.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Kenna McKinnon.

The Greatest Skill -Reparenting Ourselves

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

I feel that the greatest skill we can learn on our journey to mental wellness is the skill of reparenting ourselves. As bipolar sufferers we have suffered trauma of one form or another and this has skewed our world view. We have been trapped as hurt and damaged children in our adult bodies. To deal with that skewed world view we need a therapist. To repair our inner child, we must learn to be the understanding and caring parent we never had. I have spent a lot of time on this blog trying to convey the things we need to do to heal that injured inner child that is the make up of most bipolar sufferers when we finally seek help. Recently I came across an article that explains everything I have been trying to say in a clear and concise manner. I have included this article in my blog of the week. I ask that you read this article as it explains everything I have been trying to say better than I have been able to.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolarcom. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Maxine Harley

https://lifelabs.psychologies.co.uk/users/3881-maxine-harley/posts/17933-how-to-heal-and-re-parent-your-inner-child

Not Recommended for Bipolar Disorder

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

This post gets to the heart of “bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it.”

I am not recommending everyone run out and try things that are not recommended for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Or that this is even a good Idea. What I am saying is that properly supervised by a good professional team, if all else is failing, thinking out side of recommended treatments may be what is needed.

There are a number of things that are not recommended for the treatment of bipolar disorder that are in my bipolar management bag of tricks. The first being the medication that I am on, which shall remain nameless. When I was prescribed this med by my psychiatrist it was not recommended for bipolar disorder. After two years of trying to find meds that worked, he prescribed this med because nothing else worked and guess what, this med worked. Almost a decade later it still works and is now recommended along with many others as a viable bipolar med.

I suffer from seasonally affected bipolar 1, meaning that as the days shorten, I crash towards depression and as the days lengthen in spring I take off like a rocket into mania. That has been my pattern most of my life. My meds take care of the liftoff in the spring for the most part, but the management of the crash towards depression in the winter remained a struggle for many years. Then three years ago one of my medical team suggested light therapy as an addition to my winter management system. Light therapy is not recommended for bipolar sufferers because the light can over stimulate the brain causing mania. Which happened to me because I used the light for thirty minutes a day, every day. I overdosed on the light. I got into that bipolar way of thinking, “if it is good for you, lots may be better.”

However, ten minutes of light therapy three times a week seems to be what I need to stop that plunge towards depression. It has worked well for the last two winters.

What this post is about is that we must find what works for us, be it a recommended treatment or not. If what we are doing, or taking, is actually working, then it is for us.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dr. Ellen Albertson

http://drellenalbertson.com/6-steps-to-overcome-fear-and-step-into-your-brilliance/

I Suffer From Imposter Syndrome

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our inner selves. Yet with all the knowledge, I have gained in battling my own bipolar disorder I still find things about myself that are quite eye-opening.

Having written this blog for five years with organizations wanting to pay to be part of this site, published a children’s story, with a second in the process of being published and asked to write a book about my take on bipolar disorder, which are all good solid accomplishments. Yet, there was always this nagging doubt in the back of my mind. This doubt that I was not worthy or just a plain fraud. This doubt has been holding me back. Keeping me from fully enjoying these accomplishments and striving for more, no matter what I do. But today I have a name for what is holding me back. It is called imposter syndrome. For me that is important, putting a name to the problem. Marc Brackett of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence said it best, “Labeling your emotions is key. If you can name it, you can tame it.”

That is what I am now able to do, work on taming this feeling that I am an imposter.

What on earth is imposter syndrome, you may ask? “The imposter syndrome is a psychological term referring to a pattern of behavior where people doubt their accomplishments and have a persistent, often internalized fear of being exposed as a fraud. Not an actual disorder, the term was coined by clinical psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in 1978, when they found that despite having adequate external evidence of accomplishments, people with imposter syndrome remained convinced that they don’t deserve the success they have.” Psychology Today.

That sums up how I feel. Now that the problem has a name, I can find a solution. Having overcome other things that hitched a ride on my bipolar disorder, like addiction and severe codependency. The clinical term is comorbid disorders, but I really dislike that word. “Hitched a ride on my bipolar” paints a better picture in my mind. A picture that shows, yes these are separate things, but they stuck to me because of my untreated bipolar disorder.  

Today, I know that there is a way to root out these deeply internalized feelings that are blocking my connection with my authentic self. I will keep you posted on how dealing with Imposter Syndrome in my life progresses and what tools I use to rid myself of these thought patterns.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by
Susan Biali Haas, M.D.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/prescriptions-life/201903/make-good-habit-stick-notice-how-good-it-feels

Self Care is Like Gardening

Self care is never selfish, self care is a lot like gardening. Gardening can look selfish spending all that time alone in your yard digging, planting and watering.  You could be out with your friends, but you are home getting dirty. That is until you share the produce, the things you have grown, be it a harvest of flowers, fruits or vegetables.  It is then your friends benefit from all your hard work that you have done. Yes, self care is like gardening.

The reason I started this way and used the quote I did is that in all honesty this is the fourth post I have written this week. The other three were totally negative in both tone and subject. When I write as negatively as I have during this past week its time for a little self care, a little weeding in my garden before I lose what I am trying to produce which is, hope. I want to share hope with you. I want to show that with hard work on yourself you can learn to manage this illness of bipolar that we share and have a useful and productive life. I want to show that it is possible to build a helpful support team of both professional and non-professional people that are there for you. 

I want to take you to the garden store of bipolar management and show you the tools you may need and how to use them.  I want to show you how to clean and sharpen those tools after you used them for a while, so they stay sharp. I want to show you the best seeds to plant within yourself and the process with which they grow so you can have that harvest of usefulness.

Self care is about looking at and after yourself. It is about getting the weeds before they get too big and are harder to pull out. I found the weed that was causing the negativity, it is called expectations. I expected different results than I got from an action. I thought I had cleared my garden of expectations, but a small seed snuck in there from somewhere and began to grow. So, I spent the last few days pulling it out before it produced its own seeds. Because if you let just one weed go to seed you will have seven years of weeding to get rid of that weed again.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog from the “WhatsYourGrief” website.

Grow that Inner Child Up Part 1

Image result for inner child quotes

 

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. There are things that seem to be common to all of us as sufferers of bipolar disorder. A couple of those things are our wounded inner selves and the angry, demanding and demeaning voice in our heads. I am not a fan of the term inner child, but it has become quite popular and most people know what I am referring to when I use that term. The other term for the inner child that I have come across is “inner shadow” a term made popular in the book “The Tools” by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels.  Nor am I a fan of the concept that your inner child or inner shadow will always be with you. I believe that we can learn to grow that inner child/inner shadow to adulthood by learning to parent ourselves. The job of a parent, to take an infant and nurture it to maturity. Why can’t we take the same approach to the scared, immature child/shadow that bipolar disorder seems to have created within us and by practicing good parenting skills bring that inner child/inner shadow to maturity?

We cannot even start to nurture and love that scared, immature inner child/shadow without first dealing with that angry, demanding, demeaning voice in our heads. In my case, that voice was what my inner child had been afraid of all along.  First, you must believe as an adult you have the power to change that voice from angry, demanding and demeaning to a loving, caring voice that encourages and never criticizes. Secondly, you must bring in new knowledge and practice shutting down the old voice and introducing the new voice. I will be the first to tell you that shutting down the old voice will cause great inner turmoil in the beginning but battling through this turmoil is worth it.

When I was first told that I could change the voice in my head from angry, demanding, demeaning enemy to a loving, caring, encouraging friend I had a hard time believing it. I also had a hard time believing that voice in my head was not me. I think most of us do because we have lived with that voice for so long. Learning that only about 26% of all people have the voice in their head, their inner narrator, also was eye-opening. That statistic told me that I could even eliminate that voice if I tried and really helped convince me that I was not that inner voice. I am still a long way from eliminating that voice in my head, but I have converted it to an encouraging friend.

For this week I want to conclude by saying that before we can even reach our wounded inner selves we must deal with our inner voice and we will continue that topic next week.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dr.Ellen Albertson

http://drellenalbertson.com/6-steps-to-overcome-fear-and-step-into-your-brilliance

 

Loss and other things

It has been a rough few weeks. Even with all I have learned I still do not handle loss well and the loss of a very good friend a few weeks back affected me badly. For me, a loss is one of the greatest triggers of depression and living in my head. instead of living in the reality of today and being productive. I think what bothered me most about my friends passing was like me he had battled hard to rebuild his life. Having rebuilt his life with hundreds of friends and many interests the fact that his life was cut down by the big “C” when things were finally going well for him is what really bothered me. Then I began to examine the real issue which was this could happen to me. I could get cancer and die just when I was learning to live and enjoy life. A rather selfish thought but if you honestly look at depression it is 100% selfish. I have worked hard over this last decade to rebuild my life and have developed many friends and varied interests. For the first time in my life, I want to continue living. That bipolar thought that life is not worth living has not shown up in a long time. I want to have years to better my writing, to help others and to enjoy the best relationships I have ever had in my life. The exact opposite of the bipolar thoughts that that ran my life for most of my life

The truth is I have today. When I don’t make the best of today, that is the real problem. if I concentrate each day to better my writing, to help others and to enjoy the best relationships I have ever had in my life then I am living life

So, it is time to pick me up and start moving forward again. We will see you next week.

 

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Gabe Howard.

https://www.bphope.com/blog/everyday-life-with-bipolar-disorder

 

What? Again! Really?

 

 

This week’s post is brought to you by the instant irritability that bipolar brings to your life when something changes. Especially when your bipolar mind thinks that you and everyone else with bipolar disorder is being picked on. It used to be, throw stuff around rage when something like this week’s topic happened in my life, so I am improving.

It all started when I received an email from the team at “Bipolar Lives” asking me to fill in a questionnaire about my experience with “BD.”

BD?” “WT F is “BD.” Well, guess what I found out? Our initials have been hijacked by another disorder. That disorder is borderline personality disorder. Which now uses the initials “BP” and “BPD.” Leaving us poor bipolar people with only “BD.” Let me say at the outset that I have nothing against people with borderline personality disorder. My argument is with the people who name these disorders and the subsequent initials that define them.

Why does this upset me? Because the people who suffer from our illness, “Bipolar Disorder” are the ones that to my mind always get pushed around.  Like the name of our illness or it’s designations really don’t matter, and, in the end, we don’t matter. Sure, bipolar sufferers are by nature accommodating, as most of us seem to suffer from co-dependency, but how are we supposed to find ourselves and manage an illness whose name and definers change.  This is not the first time we as bipolar sufferers have had to change how we define ourselves.

In 1978 when I was misdiagnosed with OCD, I should have been properly diagnosed with Manic Depression. In 1980 the DSM III changed the name from Manic Depression to bipolar disorder (BP) or (BPD). The same year personality disorders (PD’s) were also recognized. In 2009 when I was finally properly diagnosed I was given the diagnosis of BP1. I have that in writing from the psychiatrist that diagnosed me. Now in 2018 our defining initials have been hijacked. Here is my simple suggestion. Give us our initials back and change the initials that define borderline personality disorder to PD(B).

Somehow I doubt that would happen but it is worth a shot.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melody Wilding LMSW.

https://psychcentral.com/blog/let-go-of-perfectionism-with-these-3-shifts

 

It Will Be Legal In Canada October 17, 2018 and It’s Summer, Time For Holidays

 

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. With marijuana to be legalized in Canada on October 17, 2018, there can be nothing more individual than this topic. Although marijuana has been legal as a prescription drug in Canada for several years it has rarely been prescribed for bipolar disorder. The Canadian Medical Association and the Canadian Psychiatric Association both hold the view that marijuana use “may also negatively interact with depression, bipolar and anxiety disorders due to its biological effects on brain maturation.” After reading study after study I can see why they came to this conclusion. However, there was a small number of study participants that marijuana use seemed to help. Which leads me to conclude that marijuana is like any other drug, prescription or not when to comes to bipolar disorder. It may hurt you or it may help you, who knows. Personally, marijuana use hurts me, so legal or not I won’t be partaking.

The interesting fact that came out in looking at the research. Bipolar suffers are twice as likely to use marijuana as non-sufferers. This statistic is from 2016. I have one suggestion to anyone who has bipolar disorder and wants to use marijuana. Keep your support team, your psychiatrist, therapist and anyone else, aware of your marijuana use. So that you and your support team can watch out for signs that marijuana use is not for you.

The things to watch out for when using marijuana when you have bipolar disorder are:

  1. An Increase in bipolar symptoms either mania or depression or rapid cycling.
  2. You reduce or stop taking already prescribed medication without medical supervision
  3. increased anxiety or paranoia.

There is also the discussion about THC and CBD, but that is for a future post.

As for right now, it is summer time and I am taking a holiday. See you in September. Enjoy your summer.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Sharon Davis as posted in New Life Outlook.

https://bipolar.newlifeoutlook.com/yoga-for-mental-health/