Category Archives: The Challenges of life

My Process for Using the Quotes of Others

Image result for You may not control all events that happen to you, but you can decide not to be reduced by them." Maya Angelou

I usually use the quotes of others as my affirmations. These affirmations are the things I meditate on to generate the deep conviction required to make things happen in my life or change my mindset. I thought sharing the process I use to make someone’s quote a usable affirmation in my life may help others. My first mentor in mental wellness taught me to make sure I understood the meaning of the words in the context presented. Not what I think they mean, but the actual meaning. To this end his first gift to me was a dictionary.

This is the process I used to make this quote of Maya Angelou’s  a usable affirmation in my life.

The first part of the quote speaks of events. What does the word events mean in this context? Events could mean concerts and parties, but this meaning does not fit the context. What events means in this context is issues and/or situations. Issues and situations happen in our bipolar lives that are for sure out our control. When the issue or situation is out of our control we react and the reaction is usually negative. In most cases this negative reaction leads to a negative mindset and then spirals into depression.

This lead me to ask myself one question, “what depresses me besides issues I can’t control?”

The answer was incredibly simple, issues or situations that are not my liking or do not go my way.

Issues or situations out of my control or not to my liking or that don’t go my way cause that instant negative mindset.

In reading this quote I had to do more work for the quote to make sense. I now understood what the events were. I did not grasp how the word reduced fit. Reduced meant make smaller to me.  I had to find a meaning for the word reduce that made sense in this quotation. In looking up the word reduce I found it can also mean to make someone weaker or in a lesser state. That allowed me to change the word reduce to depress.

The quote now read, “You may not control (or like) all the events that happen to you (nor will they go my way), but you can decide not to let these events depress you.” Realizing what these events really entailed and that the word reduced = the word depression brought this quote into sharper focus for me and closer to it becoming a useable affirmation on which to meditate.

This a quote is a hope quote, providing the hope that “I can.” I can learn that issues or situations do not need to depress me.

I have different categories of affirmations. Affirmations of hope, gratitude, personal growth and development, right thinking, belief challenging, and wisdom. I have night time and morning affirmations. I also have categories of themes I meditate on throughout the day that I not only want to understand, but also become.

When I find a quote I like, I use this process to make it useable to me and then file it under its appropriate category.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

Don’t Let Your Past be Your Future-Overcoming Emotionally Dysfunctional Messages

 

Developing Enthusiasm For the Reality Of Life

Image result for Enthusiasm is the mother of effort, and without it nothing great was ever achieved.

I wrote recently about how I seemed to ease into self-discipline. It seemed like I wasn’t disciplined and then after doing a number of small actions over and over I found that self-discipline seemed to suddenly be a habit I could count on. As I said last week, I have kept up this blog for two years something that is incredible in my mind. This week I want to talk about another aspect of mental wellness that just seemed to appear in my life by doing a number of small actions.

Last week we planned this year’s holidays, both my girlfriend and I have to let our respective employers know our holiday plans by March 24th.

“Whoopti doo, you planned your holidays.” I can here you saying.

For me this was a huge deal, because I was present for the planning and even participated in the planning. I didn’t do the “What ever, wake me up when you decided,” thing I used to do in regards to all aspects of life. I have no intention of just tagging along this year, I intend to be an active participant. In fact, I was active participant in last years’ holidays as well and for first time in my life when I look at the pictures I know I was there. I don’t have that foggy kind of disconnected feeling that accompanied most of my life.

That is my topic this week, how we can learn to not only participate in the reality of life instead of the fantasies in our minds, but develop enthusiasm for the reality of life.

When my illness ran my life I would be driven by ideas, good or bad, when manic or glued to the couch when I crashed. In between those extremes I lived in a fantasy world that bore no resemblance to my day to day existence. In short, to myself and those around me I was never present. As I said earlier, “I don’t have that foggy, kind of disconnected feeling that accompanied most of my life.” That is best how to describe it, a kind of fog that follows you around that stops you from being present. Pushing you back into your mind.

Medication on it’s own removes that fog, or most of it. Medication does not, and can not, give us the mind set or even the willingness to become involved in our lives. Medication does not evict us from the most comfortable place we know, our minds and our thinking.

The next step, “the development of enthusiasm for the reality of life” is entirely up to us. This I have come to realize is the thrust of my life and the thrust of this blog. Life is not perfect and our bipolar is not going away. We can learn to change our thinking so the effects of the negative issues in life and our bipolar responses to those issues do not cripple us as they did in the past. I could bemoan the symptoms of bipolar in this blog and the fact that I fluctuate between depression and mania, rapid cycle once in a while and flat out want to take a holiday from life. I choose not too. I choose to say to myself and you, my readers, “yep, that happens, but we can view these things differently.” I choose, and I want to encourage you to choose, to learn to participate in life, good or bad. The reason is simple; “we get out of life what we put into it.” If I, or you choose, to not participate we live in our minds and really have no life. But it has to be a conscious choice and we have to do the work to make it so.  We have to find that enthusiasm within ourselves. No one can give it to us.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

Mental Health: Finding the Help to Thrive

It’s The Second Anniversary of 365daysofbipolar.com

Image result for The Gospel of Thomas Verse three

 

Two years, it is hard for me to believe that someone one with BP1 could consistently write a blog for two years in a row. We bipolar sufferers are not known for consistency. In my previous lives I became known for a lot of things, none of them were edifying (helpful), as Paul says in 1 Corinthians 6:12. When I was granted this new life I vowed it would be different and it has been. It is different because I have studied and learned about the most important things in this world, me and this illness that controlled me and my reactions to life. In the last paragraph of every blog I spell out where our work is and what we are to work on, or battle with if you want to look at that way, to achieve mental wellness. We are to work on ourselves and to work on our thinking. It has nothing to do with anything external, it is strictly to do with ourselves and our attitudes towards life. It is true we need help to get started, we cannot diagnose ourselves or self-medicate into stability. But once that help is received and accepted in the way of a proper diagnosis, proper medication and therapy to help us learn the tools to change our thinking, the work in entirely ours and we can only work on ourselves to achieve and maintain mental wellness.

What changed everything for me was this one quote, an expansion of the quote at the beginning of this blog. This quote encapsulated my life and why it was the way it was. This quote also offered the clue as to how to change my life.

“Jesus said, “If those who lead you say to you, ‘See, the kingdom is in the sky,’ then the birds of the sky will precede you. If they say to you, ‘It is in the sea,’ then the fish will precede you. Rather, the kingdom is inside of you, and it is outside of you. When you come to know yourselves, then you will become known, and you will realize that it is you who are the sons of the living father. But if you will not know yourselves, you dwell in poverty and it is you who are that poverty.”

If you are tired of dwelling in, and more importantly “being”, the poverty that bipolar brings us. I encourage you to admit you are the problem and you need qualified medical help to start to change.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

https://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2017/03/07/how-does-your-depression-affect-your-child/

 

How to Maintain Mental Wellness Long Term

 

 

 

 

Developing a different mind can be as simple as making the decision to no longer be a victim of our bipolar disorder and become willing to be a victor over it. To stop our illness from running our lives. Decisions can be fleeting things like New Year resolutions that sound good on one day and then in a few days or weeks we are back to the same old, same old. How do we sustain that decision for mental wellness over the long term? That is the conversation of this blog over the coming year. What do we continually feed our minds to keep us from going back to being a victim of our bipolar disorder.

The convectional view is that seems to be that if we learn to take our meds as prescribed, exercise, eat properly and have a proper sleep routine life will be lovely. I do that and no longer believe that this is the secret to managing our bipolar disorder. When a crisis arises in our lives, a relationship breaks up, financial problems show up, you lose a job, what ever crisis happens to you and crisis’ will happen. It is not going to matter that you have been taking your meds, how often you exercise or how good your nutrition is or if you have a good sleep routine. Your mind is going to take over and deal with the crisis in the only way it knows how and that is badly. Unless you have been training your mind to react differently than it always has. We have a mental illness that manifests itself in our emotions, that are expressed as moods. But it is our thinking that starts our emotional turmoil and our mood swings. If we do not work to change our minds we have nothing with which to deal with any crisis we encounter but our same old fall back emotional responses that have never worked for us in the past. Why would we expect them to work for us now?

Proper sleep, taking our meds as prescribed, eating properly and being physically active are important, but none of these are as important as changing our thinking and our go to responses to life when a crisis shows up.

We need to learn to think differently and respond differently to life. This is our most important task. Next week we will examine the role of therapy in this process of changing our thinking.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

http://psychcentral.com/news/2017/01/07/toxic-bosses-bad-for-mental-health-and-work-ethic/114791.html

The Last Post of 2016, Direction for 2017

 

 

 

 

It is hard to believe that this is the last post of 2016, every year at this time causes me to reflect on the progress that has been made by this blog and the gratitude I have developed because of creating this blog. To have the support that I have built in my life, both in the professional area and in the non-professional groups and personal relationships, makes me awe struck.  I have more than I could ever have imagined. That, I think, is what 365daysofbipolar is about. Sharing the fact that there is hope, that we can come out of the darkness of bipolar, into an incredible life. We can, if we work for it, find joy and inner peace.

That is the proposed goal and direction of this blog for 2017, to focus on what we need to do to feed our mind and spirits to expose the joy and inner peace that resides in all of us. Yes, joy and inner peace is within all of us, it is not something that is found outside of us and brought in. Joy and inner peace is something that resides within us and needs to found, fanned and brought forth to shared with everyone. Our eyes may face outward, but all the real treasures are found within ourselves. Our journey in 2017, will concentrate on that inward focus and on the stated goal of mental wellness, not concentrating in mental illness. What you concentrate on expands and we want to expand our mental wellness to overcome and manage our bipolar disorder.

The other goal for 2017 is to start the 365daysofbipolar YouTube channel, commencing on July 9th, 2017.

I hope everyone had a great Christmas. I want to wish you a Happy New Year and a fantastic 2017.

 

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

 

https://myselfandhealth.com/posts/

 

 

 

Examining The Wonky Ideas We develop About Our Basic Needs

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This week I want to start a thread examining the wonky ideas we develop about our basic needs for acceptance, romance and security as manifested in our bipolar disorder. Wonky is a word that encapsulates the meaning I am trying to convey. Wonky means that our ideas about acceptance, romance and security are crooked; off-centre; askew, not functioning correctly; or faulty according to two online dictionaries. That pretty much defines how the instinctive desires of acceptance, romance and security played out in my bipolar life. It was all or nothing, a sick need for total acceptance, a perfect romance and utter security. Through my bipolar disorder, I had developed an overpowering need for total acceptance, a crippling need to be loved, plus unrealistic expectations of financial and emotional security without any personal effort.

According to Dr. Steven Reis in his work “Who Am I” there are sixteen basic human needs that motivate us. If these sixteen needs motivate us and we have wonky ideas about these needs as manifested by our bipolar disorder, we are in trouble. In my personal journey I was in serious trouble because of this. With stability I was able to define the basic needs that most motivated me and with a lot of help, be able to rein these overpowering needs in, to align them with reality most of the time. Then to readjust those needs into a proper order of priority, based on who I really am and what I really value.  The value exercise I spoke of in an earlier blog. To find our values and examine our beliefs against the light of reality, I feel, is one of the necessary exercises towards mental wellness.

I am only speaking of three of the basic human needs that motivate us, acceptance, romance and security, as I can only speak of my experience. My wonky ideas on those three basic needs caused much damage in my life. The overpowering need for total acceptance and that crippling need to be loved caused me to be chameleon, changing to fit every situation, rather than being a person of character. I wanted so much to be accepted and loved that I gave away my values, betrayed my principals, took down my boundaries and generally made a fool of myself over and over to the point that I was just a shadow. Almost not existing at all in the realm of reality. I lived in a fantasy world where my wonky beliefs and my illness ran my life, believing people, places, things and situations all conspired against me. In the area of security, both financial and emotional, I threw them out with the water that I used to bath my overpowering need for total acceptance and crippling need to be loved in.

With stability and lots of help from both professionals and non-professionals I was able to examine who I had become, why I was that way and more importantly what I could become if I stayed on the path of mental wellness. That is the hope offered all of us who are willing to battle this illness within us, believing in the idea of who we can become. We do not know who we can become and no one can tell us, either. but it is sure a lot of fun finding out.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. http://blogs.psychcentral.com/coping-depression/2016/11/supplements-for-bipolar-disorder/

 

Creativity, Meaning and Bipolar

emo-despair-is-suffering-minus-meaning

 

Like a tide our bipolar moods rise and ebb no matter how good our management system. That is the nature of moods, this effects our motivation and creativity. Having just gone through a period of an ebb tide in the mood area, I found my ability to create non existent. It is still difficult to put thoughts on paper. Knowing this ebb tide of emotion and loss of creativity is temporary, that all moods change in time, makes it a little easier for me to deal with these feelings today. Knowing that in the spring I tend to soar with the eagles and in the gloom of fall I crash like a balloon out of air. This does not change that these mood swings happen. It changes what how I react to them and how I employ my management tools. In the spring I need to tether my feet to the ground, not allowing myself to be task driven or the need to get things done will run my life. In the winter I need to force myself to get up and be productive.

In my stable state I am always slightly elevated, with creative solutions, ideas and thoughts popping in my head at all times.  It is frustrating when that creative part of my brain shuts off even for a short while. In the last month of cloudy gloom, four days of sun out of twenty-two, even with all my management tools I have struggled. Struggling is alright if we know there is a meaning for why we are struggling. That fact that I struggle like this, every year is knowledge, it is not meaning. That knowledge that this is part of the cycle of my bipolar does make it easier. The fact that I have built an arsenal of things to battle depression or mania is also helpful, but these things are not meaning either. I have to build that meaning into my life in the good times and learn to hold on tight in the bad.

I do not currently have a secret formula for building meaning into any one’s life. It was hard to find meaning in my own, I am still learning to articulate that to myself and the world. All I can pass on today is that there is meaning to all our lives, the foundation of which is gratitude. Forgiveness of ourselves and others gives us wings to fly. Self care and self knowledge give us the power to continue.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Mental wellness is all about knowledge. It is about taking that knowledge we learn and applying it to ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be.

Bipolar Burble Blog

 

 

Growing from Seed

 

Bipolar8

 

Today’s blog is something from my collection of short messages I used to send to friends on a particular internet forum. This past month has been difficult. The fact is I am struggling even with all the initiatives I take. How I know I am struggling is that I cannot think well and deleted the blog I wanted to post today. My apologies

Last fall my roommate collected a bunch of acorns off of the neighbours Burr Oak tree, which we planted and nurtured all winter in our apartment. This spring we moved then out on to the balcony. They have thrived there and last weekend we met someone who had purchased some land and they were looking for trees. So we took our oaks and planted them in the good prairie soil. Since my roommate and I are both 60ish it is not likely we will live to see these trees mature, but that is not the point we started them and in time someone will marvel at these trees when they are huge. As my roommate and I marvel at the neighbour’s oak tree at this present time.

What does this have to do with BP? Well, its like this, when we plant the seed that we no longer want to live in the cycle of depression and mania, we have to nurture that belief into a strong faith that what we want will happen. It takes time and effort but eventually we mature and learn to control our minds and emotions. And one day we marvel at how far we have come and have a strong belief in how far we can go.

Remember if you want to change your life action is required. You can think and dream about your life all you want. But unless you actually do something things will stay the same.

Today, in 2016, even as slow growing as oaks are these trees are over 2 feet tall and have a wonderful home where they are well cared for.

 

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Today is Mental Health Day. It is also Thanksgiving in Canada.

 

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Today is Mental Health Day. It is also Thanksgiving in Canada. We have a lot to be thankful for in area of mental health awareness, but also a long way to go. As a bipolar sufferer I want to contribute to the awareness of mental health issues. That is the reason for this blog, to help where I can.

Having just went through a three-day blizzard and living under very dark clouds for a week I have found it difficult to not let the blues in at some level. Realizing that this is part of my illness helps. I also know that I can take the initiative against these feelings and get up and get moving. I know today I do not have to fall down and stay there, I can get up. I know it is ok to fight these feelings they do not have to run my life.

How do I know I can take the initiative against these feelings?  How do I know I can fight these feelings? The reason I know that I can take the initiative and fight these feelings is I have practiced over and over forcing myself to get up. Sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn’t. Then I kept records of when I was able to overcome these feelings and along with my regular mood charts.

I want to share with you what I have learned.

There are proactive things you can do when fall comes around. I started taking Vitamin “D” a number of years ago, a lot of research recommends this.  I take 1000 IU daily. I use light therapy and start it early. I live in an area where in summer daylight is better than 14 hours. In the winter it is less than 8. Once daylight drops to 12 hours I bring out the light.

Mood charting is incredibly important along with journaling. I also suggest checking the weather. For myself, if I see a weather forecast like the last week I know I had better start to mentally prepare. The charts and my journal tell me if my mood is starting to fall.

I no longer lie to myself and in that way I can catch the down turns in my moods early and take action right away. In that way I am less likely to succumb to the feelings.

Is it perfect and wonderful? No it is not. It is after noon and I have still not posted this blog. I have struggled to get the wording for days.  What I can say is that I have learned I can force myself to get up if I catch those feelings early enough. If the feelings have taken over my life, then it is hard to change them.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Blog of the Week:

http://bipolarmomlife.com/

Two Steps Forward and One Back, Part 2

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In last weeks post I started a thread on triggers and learning personal crisis management. When we seek help we are in crisis. If we weren’t facing some form of crisis we would have never sought help in the first place. Some of us had help forced on us by our behavior, but even then, if we can grasp the truth that we have an illness we can take the help offered. To put us into crisis there has to be a cause. Since everything today has to have a technical title these causes have been renamed triggers.

What are triggers? Triggers are the external issues that cause failure in any management system. If we try to manage anything, people or things, there will be issues that come up that cause the management system to fail. That is just a fact.

To land us in crisis, the way we were managing our lives has to have failed. The real truth is our illness precludes us from learning to manage our lives. Most of us were always envious of those that leaned to manage themselves, their emotions and their lives. While we always seemed to make a mess of things. That is not our fault, we now know we were ill and you just can’t blame a sick person for how things turned out. I do not consider drinking alcohol and using illegal drugs, or not taking our prescribed drugs as prescribed, or not taking them at all, as triggers. They are just a continuation of our same sick behavior. We have to stop the sick behaviors and learn totally new behaviors.

To deal with our bipolar we need learn what triggers us. We can only learn this by keeping records, such as journaling and mood charting. We also need to build a way to communicate our issues so that others can help up learn new strategies. We need to build that helpful, non-judgmental support into our lives.

It is by learning crisis management that we learn what our individual routine management needs to be. This is a point that is never stressed enough. We come seeking help in crisis and therefore it is crisis management we need to learn. We need to learn what triggers us and how to either meet those triggers head on or avoid those triggers entirely and which is which. This becomes the basis for our routine management system, what I call dancing with our illness.

What triggers us individually you have to find out for yourself but some common triggers that cause a relapse of symptoms for many are:

  • Poor sleeping patterns – this is the largest cause of relapse for bipolar sufferers.
  • External stimulation – crowds, loud music, noises, traffic.
  • Stress of any kind
  • Arguments and conflicts
  • New Children
  • Loss of relationships, jobs, material things, our identity.
  • Death of any kind, people, either close or distant, or animals, pets or wild.
  • The change of seasons
  • Poor eating habits

There many more triggers, too many to list. I often think of the Tony Arata song, “The Dance”, that Garth Brooks made famous. The chorus always makes me think of how I learned to dance to with my illness, by learning to avoid this trigger or learning to overcome that trigger. Mostly learning how to dance with all my triggers. I have learned that: “It’s my life, it’s better left to chance, I could have missed the pain. But I’d have had to miss the dance.”

Today, I am glad I did not miss the chance to learn how to dance with my illness. Yes, there has been pain, I won’t deny that. But I am eternally grateful for the skills I have learned that allow me to deal with my triggers and stop my bipolar from taking over the lead in my life.

That is what we all have to learn how to do. Learn to work through the pain and dance with our bipolar.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.