Category Archives: bipolar disorder

You have to Find What Works For You

The statement, “You have to find what works for you,” is the most frustratingly true statement of the bipolar battle. This statement speaks to the individuality of bipolar as no other statement can. Only by finding what works for you can you even make the beginning steps towards mental wellness.

Well-meaning people, both professional and non-professional, often say if you do this, or do that, your bipolar will go away. The truth is they can say whatever they like. Today my first response to these statements is, “Thank you for the suggestion.” This may be because no one can tell me what to do. I would like to outgrow that response, but it is still there. The other reason is that as an individual what they are saying may or may not help. I have tried thousands of “guaranteed to work” things in my bipolar battle that did not help at all.

The thing is I did TRY them all. I took those suggestions and tried them.

Some said medication is guaranteed to work. I tried 52 different meds or combinations of meds until I found the one that worked for me.

Some said therapy is guaranteed to work. I tried several therapists and a couple of different therapy styles until I found the therapist and therapy style that worked for me.

Some said meditation is guaranteed to work.  I tried many, many styles of meditation until I found the definition and style of meditation that worked for me.

Some said exercise is guaranteed to work.  I went to the gym and lasted one week. I tried exercising a home, nope. I took my camera and my camcorder and walked in nature, that is what worked for me. I can hike for hours.

Some said diet is guaranteed to work. I tried this diet and that diet, none of them did anything for me. Then I found a group of people who have a weekly potluck and eat healthy most of the time. That is what worked for me. A diet based on friendship and encouragement.

All these things are just suggestions that I tied and tried until I found what worked for me.

Finding what works is kind of like banging your head against a wall until a door you had no idea was there begins to swing open. Suddenly you are on a totally different and unexpected path. Making the statement, “when you step on the way the way appears” truer than you can imagine.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dr. Ellen Alberstson.

Bipolar Makes Us Ego Driven

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. I write about how to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

Having bipolar means a lot of things but understanding having bipolar makes us ego-driven can give us something to watch for and try to correct.

We all think of egotists as those prideful, boastful people and as bipolar sufferers, we have nothing to be prideful or boastful about so we cannot be ego-driven. The truth is our egos explode when we are afraid, feel less than and unworthy. Our ego pops out in subtle ways that make us think that can’t be ego, but it is. Our ego pops out to hide the emotions we feel like a protector in a sick way. Our ego keeps us from learning what normal human emotions really mean and how to handle them so that we can become the person we were meant to be. Our ego does more to separate us from our true self than anything. The fact is anyone connected with their true self has no ego as they don’t need the protection ego provides.

These are the signs you are ego-driven:

Are you afraid to be alone?

Are you defensive?

Are you insecure and doubt yourself?

Are you obsessed with you and your life’s outward appearance?

Are you constantly seeking outside approval?

Are you easily offended by criticism?

Are you arrogant or become arrogant when you feel better than others?

Do you worry about what others think of you?

Do you seek revenge on those that hurt you?

Do you only hang out with like-minded people or people that agree with you?

Do you constantly apologize?

Do you always have to be right or get in the last word?

Do you have to be better than others?

Do you always have to prove yourself?

Do you talk about others (gossiping)?

Do you point out the flaws in others?

Do you bully and intimidate others?

All these manifestations of ego stand in the way of learning to love ourselves and connecting with our true selves.

‘To love yourself, you must be yourself. To be yourself you must believe in yourself.” Ed Mylett.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Kenna McKinnon.

The Greatest Skill -Reparenting Ourselves

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

I feel that the greatest skill we can learn on our journey to mental wellness is the skill of reparenting ourselves. As bipolar sufferers we have suffered trauma of one form or another and this has skewed our world view. We have been trapped as hurt and damaged children in our adult bodies. To deal with that skewed world view we need a therapist. To repair our inner child, we must learn to be the understanding and caring parent we never had. I have spent a lot of time on this blog trying to convey the things we need to do to heal that injured inner child that is the make up of most bipolar sufferers when we finally seek help. Recently I came across an article that explains everything I have been trying to say in a clear and concise manner. I have included this article in my blog of the week. I ask that you read this article as it explains everything I have been trying to say better than I have been able to.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolarcom. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Maxine Harley

https://lifelabs.psychologies.co.uk/users/3881-maxine-harley/posts/17933-how-to-heal-and-re-parent-your-inner-child

Ten Things to Think about

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

Although bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it, there are many common traits. This week is I propose ten things to think about on how we treat our best friends better than we treat ourselves.

  1. We can always trust our BFF. Yet, we never trust ourselves.
  2. We would always be accepting of our BFF. Yet, we always have trouble accepting ourselves.
  3. We would never lie to our BFF. Yet, we always lie to ourselves.
  4. We would never judge our BFF. Yet, we are always our biggest critic.
  5. We would always listen to our BFF. Yet, we seldom listen to ourselves
  6. We would always forgive our BFF. Yet, we can’t forgive ourselves.
  7. We would always make our BFF feel wanted and included. Yet, we isolate ourselves.
  8. We would always celebrate the successes of our BFF. Yet, we instantly downplay anything good we ever do.
  9. We don’t have to try to do things with our BFF. Yet, doing anything in our own life is a chore.
  10.  We are always kind to our BFF. Yet we are seldom kind to ourselves.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday.

Like and follow us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com.

Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Margarita Tartakovsky M.S.

https://psychcentral.com/blog/are-you-making-these-4-communication-mistakes-in-your-romantic-relationship/

Not Recommended for Bipolar Disorder

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.  I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our authentic selves. I write from the perspective of someone who suffers from bipolar disorder, not as an expert. I share the knowledge I have gained in the hopes it may help you.

This post gets to the heart of “bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it.”

I am not recommending everyone run out and try things that are not recommended for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Or that this is even a good Idea. What I am saying is that properly supervised by a good professional team, if all else is failing, thinking out side of recommended treatments may be what is needed.

There are a number of things that are not recommended for the treatment of bipolar disorder that are in my bipolar management bag of tricks. The first being the medication that I am on, which shall remain nameless. When I was prescribed this med by my psychiatrist it was not recommended for bipolar disorder. After two years of trying to find meds that worked, he prescribed this med because nothing else worked and guess what, this med worked. Almost a decade later it still works and is now recommended along with many others as a viable bipolar med.

I suffer from seasonally affected bipolar 1, meaning that as the days shorten, I crash towards depression and as the days lengthen in spring I take off like a rocket into mania. That has been my pattern most of my life. My meds take care of the liftoff in the spring for the most part, but the management of the crash towards depression in the winter remained a struggle for many years. Then three years ago one of my medical team suggested light therapy as an addition to my winter management system. Light therapy is not recommended for bipolar sufferers because the light can over stimulate the brain causing mania. Which happened to me because I used the light for thirty minutes a day, every day. I overdosed on the light. I got into that bipolar way of thinking, “if it is good for you, lots may be better.”

However, ten minutes of light therapy three times a week seems to be what I need to stop that plunge towards depression. It has worked well for the last two winters.

What this post is about is that we must find what works for us, be it a recommended treatment or not. If what we are doing, or taking, is actually working, then it is for us.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dr. Ellen Albertson

http://drellenalbertson.com/6-steps-to-overcome-fear-and-step-into-your-brilliance/

Finding a different starting point

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.

I had to find a different starting point for many things in my life. I had to find a different starting point in the area of meditation than what was being offered me, as none of those ways worked. I had to find different definitions for ambition and success before I could really move forward.

When I read the quote, “Discover who you truly are and fully give every aspect of your uniqueness to the world. This is your path to an extraordinary life.” James McWhinney.

That is what I really wanted, “an extraordinary life” but I only saw one part of what the author was saying, that is “give every aspect of your uniqueness to the world.”. I latched on to that part of the quote and missed the rest. Because I did show “every aspect of my uniqueness to world” on a lot of occasions and all it ever got me was rejected or locked up. So that approach has a real stigma attached to it and “showing my uniqueness” was not my path to an extraordinary life.

What I am writing about is how we, as bipolar sufferers, must look at things that are said and written and then set out for the “so called normal” world. We must recognize that we see and interpret things differently. Even when we are on the path to mental wellness, we must be careful that we are hearing and reading what is said and written and not go by the reaction in our head. When I read things like the above quote I need to slow down and read the whole quote a few times. Then relate that quote to what I know.

For me the path to extraordinary life did lay in discovering who I truly was. I called it “growing my inner child”, but “giving every aspect of my uniqueness to the world” was not part of that path

I am not about show my uniqueness to the world ever again, because my uniqueness to me means me in my illness.  I have worked diligently at discovering who I am so that I can present that person to the world, the sane reasonable person. I find I am not that unique when I am close to mental wellness. I can find sameness or shared ideals with others that do not make me feel isolated, unique and different. Those feelings and actions of isolation and uniqueness are a part of my illness. Always thinking I was different was fuel for my illness.

If I want to carve a path to an extraordinary life, my uniqueness and the stigma attached to that word is not the direction that I need to go in, I need to find a different starting point. On this issue of finding an extraordinary life, I find looking for the sameness with others, especially those I respect, to be the starting point for me.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melanie McKinnon as appeared in BPHope blog.

Due to a technical error this blog is unavailable.

Growing Your Inner Child part 3

“Without a solid foundation, you will have trouble creating anything of value” erickaopenheimer.com

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. That individuality also applies to the tools and methods used to manage bipolar disorder. When I talk on the things I use to manage my bipolar I am talking about what worked for me. These suggestions are just that suggestions, but they may work for you. Then again they may not. But at least it is somewhere to start. And that is the real issue, we have no idea where to start on this journey of healing and growing. If you want to grow your inner child to match your adult frame, in other words, connect with your authentic self you need a starting point.

You can do nothing without a proper diagnosis and, more importantly the proper medication, that works for you. The proper diagnosis and proper medication give’s you a stable mind with which to work. The next thing you need is an unbiased observer, today we call them therapists or counsellors. There is one other ingredient and that is knowledge. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. If you don’t know, you can not act.

I am fond of the sailing ship analogy as it portrays in the minds eye you are sailing a magnificent ship across calm waters. A proper diagnosis and proper medications are the fair wind in you sail and your rudder. The therapist or councillor is the dock worker that helps you untie from the dock by helping you change your thinking and challenges your false beliefs.  Connecting with and living as your authentic self becomes your course to your own tropical island.

If you try to sail away on your journey to find your authentic self without the fair wind and rudder, not willing to gain any knowledge and not having the aid of the dock worker, you are just a rudderless ship that is going to hit the rocks again and again.

My own journey of being improperly diagnosed for decades and my unwillingness to listen to anyone; caused me to have that cyclic existence of lose everything, get patched up and set out again, do well for a bit, then lose everything again. This cycle would repeat over and over until the day I was properly diagnosed with Bipolar 1, found meds that worked and spent two years in a therapist’s office. My experience is not that different than many others who have honestly shared their experiences with me. That is why I can say with certainty that even though we are individuals and differ in the presentation and control of our illness to some degree, without a proper diagnosis and proper medication. Coupled with the aid of a good therapist and a willingness to learn about ourselves and our illness. Our journey to connect with our authentic self will be futile.

The good new is we can incorporate all these aspects the day we get our proper diagnosis. It takes time to find meds that work, and you may have to kiss a few frogs before you find a therapist you click with. This takes time but you can set your course towards developing a strong connection with your authentic selves by learning on your own about this illness and how it affects you. To find what works for you in managing your bipolar disorder and just as importantly what doesn’t work. This is all knowledge

Progress is slow at first but as you progress towards your goal of connecting with your authentic self you will find your mental anguish and emotional turmoil will slowly subside.

These are the first things we need to do embark on that journey towards mental wellness, to make our lives “Ducky” even with bipolar disorder.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Becky Wicks on the NewLifeOutlook website.

https://bipolar.newlifeoutlook.com/fatigue-bipolar/?referrer=Newsletter&utm_campaign=NLO-Bipolar-Newsletter&utm_adgroup=Newsletter&keywords=bipolar

Grow that Inner Child Up Part 1

Image result for inner child quotes

 

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. There are things that seem to be common to all of us as sufferers of bipolar disorder. A couple of those things are our wounded inner selves and the angry, demanding and demeaning voice in our heads. I am not a fan of the term inner child, but it has become quite popular and most people know what I am referring to when I use that term. The other term for the inner child that I have come across is “inner shadow” a term made popular in the book “The Tools” by Phil Stutz and Barry Michels.  Nor am I a fan of the concept that your inner child or inner shadow will always be with you. I believe that we can learn to grow that inner child/inner shadow to adulthood by learning to parent ourselves. The job of a parent, to take an infant and nurture it to maturity. Why can’t we take the same approach to the scared, immature child/shadow that bipolar disorder seems to have created within us and by practicing good parenting skills bring that inner child/inner shadow to maturity?

We cannot even start to nurture and love that scared, immature inner child/shadow without first dealing with that angry, demanding, demeaning voice in our heads. In my case, that voice was what my inner child had been afraid of all along.  First, you must believe as an adult you have the power to change that voice from angry, demanding and demeaning to a loving, caring voice that encourages and never criticizes. Secondly, you must bring in new knowledge and practice shutting down the old voice and introducing the new voice. I will be the first to tell you that shutting down the old voice will cause great inner turmoil in the beginning but battling through this turmoil is worth it.

When I was first told that I could change the voice in my head from angry, demanding, demeaning enemy to a loving, caring, encouraging friend I had a hard time believing it. I also had a hard time believing that voice in my head was not me. I think most of us do because we have lived with that voice for so long. Learning that only about 26% of all people have the voice in their head, their inner narrator, also was eye-opening. That statistic told me that I could even eliminate that voice if I tried and really helped convince me that I was not that inner voice. I am still a long way from eliminating that voice in my head, but I have converted it to an encouraging friend.

For this week I want to conclude by saying that before we can even reach our wounded inner selves we must deal with our inner voice and we will continue that topic next week.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dr.Ellen Albertson

http://drellenalbertson.com/6-steps-to-overcome-fear-and-step-into-your-brilliance

 

Loss and other things

It has been a rough few weeks. Even with all I have learned I still do not handle loss well and the loss of a very good friend a few weeks back affected me badly. For me, a loss is one of the greatest triggers of depression and living in my head. instead of living in the reality of today and being productive. I think what bothered me most about my friends passing was like me he had battled hard to rebuild his life. Having rebuilt his life with hundreds of friends and many interests the fact that his life was cut down by the big “C” when things were finally going well for him is what really bothered me. Then I began to examine the real issue which was this could happen to me. I could get cancer and die just when I was learning to live and enjoy life. A rather selfish thought but if you honestly look at depression it is 100% selfish. I have worked hard over this last decade to rebuild my life and have developed many friends and varied interests. For the first time in my life, I want to continue living. That bipolar thought that life is not worth living has not shown up in a long time. I want to have years to better my writing, to help others and to enjoy the best relationships I have ever had in my life. The exact opposite of the bipolar thoughts that that ran my life for most of my life

The truth is I have today. When I don’t make the best of today, that is the real problem. if I concentrate each day to better my writing, to help others and to enjoy the best relationships I have ever had in my life then I am living life

So, it is time to pick me up and start moving forward again. We will see you next week.

 

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Gabe Howard.

https://www.bphope.com/blog/everyday-life-with-bipolar-disorder

 

What? Again! Really?

 

 

This week’s post is brought to you by the instant irritability that bipolar brings to your life when something changes. Especially when your bipolar mind thinks that you and everyone else with bipolar disorder is being picked on. It used to be, throw stuff around rage when something like this week’s topic happened in my life, so I am improving.

It all started when I received an email from the team at “Bipolar Lives” asking me to fill in a questionnaire about my experience with “BD.”

BD?” “WT F is “BD.” Well, guess what I found out? Our initials have been hijacked by another disorder. That disorder is borderline personality disorder. Which now uses the initials “BP” and “BPD.” Leaving us poor bipolar people with only “BD.” Let me say at the outset that I have nothing against people with borderline personality disorder. My argument is with the people who name these disorders and the subsequent initials that define them.

Why does this upset me? Because the people who suffer from our illness, “Bipolar Disorder” are the ones that to my mind always get pushed around.  Like the name of our illness or it’s designations really don’t matter, and, in the end, we don’t matter. Sure, bipolar sufferers are by nature accommodating, as most of us seem to suffer from co-dependency, but how are we supposed to find ourselves and manage an illness whose name and definers change.  This is not the first time we as bipolar sufferers have had to change how we define ourselves.

In 1978 when I was misdiagnosed with OCD, I should have been properly diagnosed with Manic Depression. In 1980 the DSM III changed the name from Manic Depression to bipolar disorder (BP) or (BPD). The same year personality disorders (PD’s) were also recognized. In 2009 when I was finally properly diagnosed I was given the diagnosis of BP1. I have that in writing from the psychiatrist that diagnosed me. Now in 2018 our defining initials have been hijacked. Here is my simple suggestion. Give us our initials back and change the initials that define borderline personality disorder to PD(B).

Somehow I doubt that would happen but it is worth a shot.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melody Wilding LMSW.

https://psychcentral.com/blog/let-go-of-perfectionism-with-these-3-shifts