Category Archives: Welcome

I Suffer From Imposter Syndrome

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. I write mostly about somewhere to start in growing and healing. How to resume our connection with our inner selves. Yet with all the knowledge, I have gained in battling my own bipolar disorder I still find things about myself that are quite eye-opening.

Having written this blog for five years with organizations wanting to pay to be part of this site, published a children’s story, with a second in the process of being published and asked to write a book about my take on bipolar disorder, which are all good solid accomplishments. Yet, there was always this nagging doubt in the back of my mind. This doubt that I was not worthy or just a plain fraud. This doubt has been holding me back. Keeping me from fully enjoying these accomplishments and striving for more, no matter what I do. But today I have a name for what is holding me back. It is called imposter syndrome. For me that is important, putting a name to the problem. Marc Brackett of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence said it best, “Labeling your emotions is key. If you can name it, you can tame it.”

That is what I am now able to do, work on taming this feeling that I am an imposter.

What on earth is imposter syndrome, you may ask? “The imposter syndrome is a psychological term referring to a pattern of behavior where people doubt their accomplishments and have a persistent, often internalized fear of being exposed as a fraud. Not an actual disorder, the term was coined by clinical psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in 1978, when they found that despite having adequate external evidence of accomplishments, people with imposter syndrome remained convinced that they don’t deserve the success they have.” Psychology Today.

That sums up how I feel. Now that the problem has a name, I can find a solution. Having overcome other things that hitched a ride on my bipolar disorder, like addiction and severe codependency. The clinical term is comorbid disorders, but I really dislike that word. “Hitched a ride on my bipolar” paints a better picture in my mind. A picture that shows, yes these are separate things, but they stuck to me because of my untreated bipolar disorder.  

Today, I know that there is a way to root out these deeply internalized feelings that are blocking my connection with my authentic self. I will keep you posted on how dealing with Imposter Syndrome in my life progresses and what tools I use to rid myself of these thought patterns.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by
Susan Biali Haas, M.D.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/prescriptions-life/201903/make-good-habit-stick-notice-how-good-it-feels

Finding a different starting point

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.

I had to find a different starting point for many things in my life. I had to find a different starting point in the area of meditation than what was being offered me, as none of those ways worked. I had to find different definitions for ambition and success before I could really move forward.

When I read the quote, “Discover who you truly are and fully give every aspect of your uniqueness to the world. This is your path to an extraordinary life.” James McWhinney.

That is what I really wanted, “an extraordinary life” but I only saw one part of what the author was saying, that is “give every aspect of your uniqueness to the world.”. I latched on to that part of the quote and missed the rest. Because I did show “every aspect of my uniqueness to world” on a lot of occasions and all it ever got me was rejected or locked up. So that approach has a real stigma attached to it and “showing my uniqueness” was not my path to an extraordinary life.

What I am writing about is how we, as bipolar sufferers, must look at things that are said and written and then set out for the “so called normal” world. We must recognize that we see and interpret things differently. Even when we are on the path to mental wellness, we must be careful that we are hearing and reading what is said and written and not go by the reaction in our head. When I read things like the above quote I need to slow down and read the whole quote a few times. Then relate that quote to what I know.

For me the path to extraordinary life did lay in discovering who I truly was. I called it “growing my inner child”, but “giving every aspect of my uniqueness to the world” was not part of that path

I am not about show my uniqueness to the world ever again, because my uniqueness to me means me in my illness.  I have worked diligently at discovering who I am so that I can present that person to the world, the sane reasonable person. I find I am not that unique when I am close to mental wellness. I can find sameness or shared ideals with others that do not make me feel isolated, unique and different. Those feelings and actions of isolation and uniqueness are a part of my illness. Always thinking I was different was fuel for my illness.

If I want to carve a path to an extraordinary life, my uniqueness and the stigma attached to that word is not the direction that I need to go in, I need to find a different starting point. On this issue of finding an extraordinary life, I find looking for the sameness with others, especially those I respect, to be the starting point for me.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melanie McKinnon as appeared in BPHope blog.

Due to a technical error this blog is unavailable.

Growing Your Inner child Part 4

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. That individuality also applies to the tools and methods used to manage bipolar disorder. When I talk on the things I use to manage my bipolar I am talking about what worked for me. These suggestions are just that suggestions, but they may work for you. Then again they may not. But at least it is somewhere to start.

And that is what we are talking about, somewhere to start towards growing and healing. To resume our connection with our inner selves. That is the dictionary definition of our inner child, “a person’s supposed original or true self, especially when regarded as damaged or concealed by negative childhood experiences.”

It has been scientifically proven that “Individuals with bipolar disorder suffered greater childhood trauma compared to subjects with unipolar disorder and healthy individuals.”

This is wonderful knowledge and knowledge is a key ingredient, but we can really do nothing with that knowledge until we have a proper diagnosis and medications that give us a stable mind with which to deal with this trauma and negative experiences. We also need some sort of guide, a counselor or therapist. to help us change our thinking and challenge our false beliefs.

Then we need to amass the tools and skills that allow us to peel back the layers of life’s bad experiences that buried our authentic self and turned it into that scared, immature inner child/shadow that has held us back.

For me, the first step was changing that angry, demanding, demeaning voice in my head to a loving, caring voice that encourages and never criticizes. I did this through the practice of affirmations.

The next and most important skill we need to learn about is boundaries, what they are and how practice putting boundaries into place in our lives. There are many good books on boundaries and several organizations offer “Boundary” classes.

It is by continuing to amass knowledge, tools and management skills that we come to meet and accept our true selves, thus growing our inner child/shadow to match our adult selves.  

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by:
Laurie Seymour

https://www.positivelypositive.com/2019/03/13/how-questioning-your-beliefs-can-guide-your-life/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+positivelypositive%2Fpositive+%28Positively+Positive%29

Growing Your Inner Child Part 2

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”. However, there are also many similarities each of us share. One thing that most of us share is a severely wounded inner child.

What is an inner child? According to Google Dictionary inner child is defined as “a person’s supposed original or true self, especially when regarded as damaged or concealed by negative childhood experiences.”

A study published in the Internal Journal of Psychiatry in Clinical Practice volume 22, 2018 – issue 2, concluded: “Individuals with bipolar disorder suffered greater childhood trauma compared to subjects with unipolar disorder and healthy individuals.”

Having defined our severely wounded inner child as nothing more than our true selves in hiding due to childhood trauma, it is easy to see that growing our inner child is a healing exercise This work will reveal our true selves not only to us, but also everyone else. In my original post on this subject I found I could do nothing towards this healing before I dealt with that angry, demanding, demeaning voice in my head. But once I turned that voice into a loving, caring voice that encourages and never criticizes I found I could make real progress on this journey of healing and revealing my true self.

This journey is the basis of my fourth truth of bipolar, “It is only by developing a strong connection with our authentic selves can we overcome our mental anguish and emotional turmoil.”

I can pretty much guarantee that if you embark on this same journey of healing and growing that reveals your true self your emotional and mental turmoil will slip away.

Over the next months I plan on presenting concrete tools that can be used to aid on this journey. If you remember, when I talk on the things, I use to manage my bipolar I am talking about what worked for me. These suggestions are just that suggestions, but they may work for you. Then again, they may not. But at least it is somewhere to start.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on Twitter.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Al Levin M.ED

I have to admit that Al is a friend of mine. You can find Al at his website https://thedepressionfiles.com

and you can listen to his podcast on most podcast providers it is called The Depression Files.

https://thedepressionfiles.com/2016/09/08/we-create-meaning-to-our-thoughts-challenging-the-negative-thoughts

Happy New Year and Welcome to 2018

Happy New Year and welcome to 2018. This site has always been dedicated to learning to manage, live with and enjoy life even with bipolar disorder. For 365daysofbipolar.com there is a new direction. I want to provide important information on something I believe in strongly. How to build a professional and non-professional support team. What works and what doesn’t and who should make up your team. I am going to include interviews with both professional and non-professional people who support many people with our shared illness of bipolar disorder.

Managing and living well with bipolar cannot be done without proper support. Although we, the individual sufferer, are expected to do the work required to manage our illness. We need others to act as guides and sounding boards to keep us on track. To help us through the ups and downs of life and to tell us the truth when our bipolar minds lead us astray.

Our bipolar minds cause us to be at least standoffish and at times total isolationists. We bring our past hurts into every new encounter and destroy things before they even start. We, as bipolar sufferers, find it difficult to build and keep relationships. Which makes building a great support team difficult for us as a support team is nothing more than many relationships on many levels. The starting point for all relationships and my other focus for 2018 is how to build a proper relationship with yourself.

Mental wellness is all about knowledge of our selves and learning skills to overcome our bipolar symptoms.  There are many great books and apps that have appeared on the market in the past few years that are proving helpful. To aid in this process of finding what may work for you  I plan on doing book and app reviews in the coming year.

I am looking forward to an exiting 2018 for 365daysofbipolar.com

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by: Hillary Jacob Hendel

https://www.hilaryjacobshendel.com/its-not-always-depression-sometimes-its-

Creativity, Meaning and Bipolar

 

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Like a tide our bipolar moods rise and ebb no matter how good our management system. That is the nature of moods, this effects our motivation and creativity. Having just gone through a period of an ebb tide in the mood area, I found my ability to create non existent. It is still difficult to put thoughts on paper. Knowing this ebb tide of emotion and loss of creativity is temporary, that all moods change in time, makes it a little easier for me to deal with these feelings today. Knowing that in the spring I tend to soar with the eagles and in the gloom of fall I crash like a balloon out of air. This does not change that these mood swings happen. It changes what how I react to them and how I employ my management tools. In the spring I need to tether my feet to the ground, not allowing myself to be task driven or the need to get things done will run my life. In the winter I need to force myself to get up and be productive.

In my stable state I am always slightly elevated, with creative solutions, ideas and thoughts popping in my head at all times.  It is frustrating when that creative part of my brain shuts off even for a short while. In the last month of cloudy gloom, four days of sun out of twenty-two, even with all my management tools I have struggled. Struggling is alright if we know there is a meaning for why we are struggling. That fact that I struggle like this, every year is knowledge, it is not meaning. That knowledge that this is part of the cycle of my bipolar does make it easier. The fact that I have built an arsenal of things to battle depression or mania is also helpful, but these things are not meaning either. I have to build that meaning into my life in the good times and learn to hold on tight in the bad.

I do not currently have a secret formula for building meaning into any one’s life. It was hard to find meaning in my own, I am still learning to articulate that to myself and the world. All I can pass on today is that there is meaning to all our lives, the foundation of which is gratitude. Forgiveness of ourselves and others gives us wings to fly. Self care and self knowledge give us the power to continue.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Mental wellness is all about knowledge. It is about taking that knowledge we learn and applying it to ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be.

Make Lists Of Positive Aspects

Attitudes, Thoughts and Perspectives

“Don’t talk about the bad times, the struggles, the ups and downs. Talk about learning how to live. How to find joy in your life, even if you are bipolar.” My friend Greta.

When I was thinking about starting this blog that was the one thing that made sense. I want to talk about learning how to live with bipolar. How to find peace within ourselves even though this illness and it effects do everything it can to disturb that peace. For the most part I have been successful at that in my own life. We all have times when things are not great, not even good. The not even good, best describes the last few months. I have really struggled since October, but no matter what I stick to my routine and recite the affirmations that hold so much meaning for me. That is what it is, my routine and my affirmations. The touch stones of every day life that mean I am alive. I have to admit that routine and those affirmations have been what has kept me from really getting lost. I only slightly lost my way for a time. I am tired of even that now, slightly losing my way. It is time to follow my own advice and stick to the path, even if it seems all up hill and a hard climb all the time.

I could blame my bipolar or a couple of situations that came up or people for what caused this slide, but that is not the truth. It was my mind and my perspective on those situations and people that did me in. I lost the proper perspective on life that I worked so hard to gain. I forgot, and had to remind myself, that perspective is everything.  I forgot to be grateful for the half full glass of water and that I can do nothing about the half empty part, unless I get up and walk to the sink to add more water. That was my biggest error I did not get up and do anything unless I had to. I forgot that joy is found in doing, just because. Joy is found in accomplishment no matter what my mind is saying. I can tell my mind to shut up or push past those negative thoughts. A few years ago I learned I could do that. I forgot I have to keep practicing this skill to get really good at it.

Effort is required in life. I know that intellectually, but I have to move that knowledge to my soul and own it, to make it my life practice.

We are meant to live in freedom, in peace, in joy and in love, even with bipolar. It is only our attitudes, thoughts and perspectives that stand in the way of this new and exciting way of life. This last few months that has shown me this.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

 

What Bipolar Mixed Moods Really Feel Like

 

Internal Reflection

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Bipolar disorder is a mental illness. So it stands to reason that our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things. Battling bipolar is a totally internal battle, we may be triggered by external things but it is what we do internally before we respond to that trigger that makes the situation a great one or disaster.  Do you know that there is a choice in that statement? There actually is, we can choose to, or not to, do something internally before we respond to that external thing that is triggering us. In the English language we also have two different words we can use depending on whether we do something internally or we do not. If we do something internally, it is called responding. If we do nothing internally, it is called reacting. I always reacted and it never got me anywhere.

What I found really interesting is that in learning to respond the trigger diminished. What I mean by that is; when I go internal to find an appropriate response, the trigger, no matter what it is, disappears while I look inside myself for the response. It is physically impossible to look two places at once. When I focus on the internal, the external disappears. That was a novel discovery for me and turned out to be the key to really managing my bipolar disorder.

By concentrating on my internal communication, before it became external, I learned I could find myself. Through this I learned that I could hear what my body was telling me. It turns out my body is my early warning system. If something is affecting me, my body is the first to react. Stress causes my digestive tract to revolt. Worry increased my blood pressure. In learning to listen to my body I can head off negative influences in the early stages.

By looking internally, I found my mind mostly lied to me and it was my job to root out those lies and replace them with truths.

Our illness causes us to look externally for both cause and cure. Yet internal reflection makes us realize that beyond our medication which created the stability to look inside ourselves, our causes and cures are strictly internal.

Please remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

http://hubpages.com/education/How-to-Discover-Your-Best-Possible-Self

 

 

My Life’s Mission Part 2

 

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The second part of my life’s mission is to help and encourage others to understand that mental wellness is really a possibility in their lives. I can only do this through sharing my experience and what I have learned, and lived, in regards to this illness.  I am a BP sufferer writing and talking about my experiences. We share an illness that has one quality that makes Bi-Polar stand out from all other illnesses – “Bi-Polar is as individual as the people that suffer from it.”

This individuality makes Bi-Polar a difficult illness to diagnosis, treat and manage. I said difficult, I did not say impossible. Every success story of someone who has learned to live with, and successfully manage their Bi-Polar, including my own, contains these words, “Learning to manage Bi-Polar is really hard work, but it is worth it.”  What is learning to manage your Bi-Polar worth? It is absolutely “Priceless”, to quote MasterCard. Learning to manage this illness on a day to day basis through any storm life can throw at us is the greatest gift you can give yourself.  I want to encourage you that mental wellness is a real possibility for each of us.  From the success stories of many others, including my own, learning to manage this illness leads to a personal sense of accomplishment that is indescribable.

Once we have a proper diagnosis, by this I mean that we have a certificate we can hang on the wall that tells us we have an illness that is not going to go away.  Not some made up thing that you cannot back up. I never even thought it was possible, or that anyone would want, to make up a Bi-Polar diagnosis but in my conversations with therapists and counselors, I was told that there are many who “think” they are BP sufferers. A proper diagnosis is essential to getting proper help.

Personally, in 2011, I hung my diagnosis on the wall so that I could see it and come to accept that I had this illness and it was not going away. Today, I have accepted that Bi-Polar haunts my life at all times and always will. Why I did I do this? I was tired of being able to lie to myself that I was all right and then have my world fall apart in short order. I needed to convince myself that I would never be alright unless I worked at it constantly. I recommend any practice that keeps your diagnosis prominently before you to allow you to come to the place of admittance and acceptance that you have this illness and it is not going away. If your diagnosis is kept secret in your doctor’s office and you do not have that regular reminder, your mind can down play and out right deny the severity of the situation. This is not something you want to keep secret from yourself and in the beginning a few close people; it is the explanation for why you were not handling life! And you can actually do something about it. The fact that we have a proper diagnosis means we have something that can give us hope! Hope that maybe, just maybe, we can be all right.

The next step, after our diagnosis, is to learn to manage our illness. The first critical step in that management process is to find the proper medication that will stabilize our minds.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember, our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”  I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

365daysofbipolar is one year old

 

 

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On February 20th it has been one year, 365 days, since I started this blog. It is my fervent prayer that I have encouraged someone with my writings thus far and hope to encourage many more in the future.  2015 was a growth year in knowledge, both technical and spiritual. I want thank all those that have followed me and encouraged me this past year.

Rather than talking about a topic on Bi-Polar today I want to talk about my plans for 365daysofbipolar and the site name 365daysofbipolar.com.  Recently someone asked me where the name 365daysofbipolar came from.  Actually they said. “Where did the idea for the name 365daysofbipolar came from, it seems silly?”  A year and bit ago I started a project to write a daily meditation book for Bi-Polar sufferers (it takes a long time to write a book) and I came up with 365daysofbipolar as the tittle. From that point I started to use 365daysofbipolar as a brand name in my crusade to encourage other BP sufferer’s on to the path of mental wellness through experience, strength and hope.

365daysofbipolar.com, the blog, has been joined by 365daysofbiplar@gmail.com to enable better communication. I plan to make this site better and more interactive as my technical skill increases and my BP resources grow.  I am hoping the book of meditations entitled 365daysofbipolar will be published this fall. I have also had some people express interest in my doing a YouTube channel after my short foray into alternative radio.  I am looking in to this and if this becomes a reality, the 365daysofbipolar YouTube channel will be launched as well. I will post more announcements on these projects on Facebook.

One of the greatest challenges of this last year has been finding my voice and putting forth my authentic self. To be true to myself I want to state clearly what I believe:

I believe that, as Dr. Dwayne Dyer says, “We are spirits having a human experience.”

“Bi-Polar is a rupture of communication between the human spirit and the human mind.  Medication stabilizes our mind allowing us to heal that rupture and strengthen our spirit to be mentally well.”

In 2016 and onward there will be a lot of information on how to heal and strengthen the spirit presented. The main focus 365daysofbipolar will always remain to encourage others on to, and continue on, the path of mental wellness.

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.