Tag Archives: Action

It Is By Repetition

Image result for repetition zig ziglar

To say I have struggled this past six or eight months would be a terrible understatement. Situations and issues kept showing up that would knock me down every time I felt that I was getting back up. No tool in my mental health tool box seemed to be able to help me. Then I ran into a situation in the real world that gave me the clue as to what I had to do to win my mental battle. In the hands-on situation, I had to install a plug into a water heater, but no wrench or socket I owned fit. The simple solution was to go to the local hardware store and by the proper socket for the job. But what did I do, I drove around the city and tried to borrow the proper socket from one of my friends. I did this on solid reasoning. I will probably only need this socket one time in my entire life once the plug was in, it should not have to be removed again. Typical bipolar thinking, why was the plug missing in the first place? Because someone lost it when they drained the water heater last fall so it would not freeze up over the winter. This fact alone should have told me that I would need that wrench again because I was now responsible for that water heater that needed to be drained. But I wasted and entire afternoon asking friends if they had a 15/16 inch socket. Which none of them owned. Then the next morning I went to the store spent the money and now own the socket.  I found out I will need that socket at least twice a year as the water heater is subject to scaling due the hardness of the water. I am glad I bought that socket because borrowing a tool from someone, even a couple of times a year, delays your work because of their availability.

I used the almost an identical process in learning to deal with the issues that kept knocking me down into depression. First, I tried to borrow tools from the mental health tool boxes of my friends and none seemed to help. I went to my group of professionals and although they could not direct me to the tool I needed, they did identify that all the issues that seemed to knock me into depression in the past few years had a common denominator and that this common denominator had come up a lot this winter. Truthfully, it was by a google search of events out of our control that came upon Maya Angelou’s quote. “You may not control all the events that happen to you, but you can decide not to let them reduce you.”

In my last post, I went through the process that I used to make this quote meaningful to me, even more meaningful than when I first read it and said that is it, that is exactly what I am doing letting events out of my control reduce me to depression.

I knew that water heater needed a new plug when I turned on the water and it just ran out the bottom of the water heater. Now that I know events that I have no control over but affect me directly make me depressed I can bring out my new knowledge that I do not need to let these events reduce me to depression.

Here is where repetition comes in, I had seen enough water heaters in my life to know that they were meant to hold water, not let it drain out the bottom on to the floor unless they were malfunctioning. It was by seeing so many water heaters that I could quickly asses this water heater was not malfunctioning and simply needed a plug.

Now that I was aware that I did not need to let events, especially events I felt were out of my control, reduce me to depression I could change. This did not mean that I knew how to stop these types of situations from depressing me, it just meant that I knew others did not let themselves be depressed by these situations. This told me two things, that I still resided in the uniqueness of our illness and if others did not get depressed by situations out of their control, I could learn to not get depressed as well.

I had used a similar emotion regulating tool when I let go of anxiety and stress. In learning that others did not get stressed out and anxious in the same situations as I did, I could by practice and by repetition, not get anxious and stressed out either. This does not mean I do not get anxious or stressed out any more. It means I no longer get anxious and stressed out, except for those rare situations when everyone else is anxious and stressed out too.

I am using the same idea to overcome being depressed by events out of my control. I practice my new knowledge where ever I can and repeat that quote as my theme for the day over and over as an affirmation.

It is only by awareness that we can change. I am now on the repetition part to drive the new habit of not becoming depressed by situations to replace a lifetime of allowing these situations to depress me.   It’s hard work, implementing new knowledge and new habits. But it you read the last line of this blog you will understand why I stay on the hard path.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

www.psychologytoday.com/blog/meditation-modern-life/201201/awareness-the-cornerstone-changing-our-behavior

Developing Enthusiasm for the Reality of Life Part Two

 

Image result for make your life a story worth telling

This is part two of developing enthusiasm for the reality of life. The subtitle of this series is Adam Braun’s quote, “Make your life a story worth telling.” If you have ever heard a good story teller, they all have one thing in common, they are enthusiastic about their stories. Our life is our story and we need to get enthusiastic about our lives for it to be a good story.

Here are five internal things to do to become enthusiastic about your life:

  1. Stop letting your thinking control your life and learn to control your thinking. As I say at the end of every blog our battle is with our minds. By that I mean specifically our thinking. Our thinking generates our reactions to life and our self talk. We need to take control of our thinking to change our reactions and our self talk.
  2. Develop a positive attitude and keep it. According to Earle Nightengale, the motivational speaker and radio broadcaster, attitude is most important word in the English language.
  3. Ask yourself questions. The net result of two years of counselling was instead of the counselor asking me questions and me answering, I learned to question myself and find my own answers within myself. From the semi negative questions like: Why am feeling this way? What caused that thought? Why do I believe that? To the positive questions like: How do I get better and stay better? What is the best way to respond here?
  4. Remember what situations made you enthusiastic in the past and bring that feeling to the present. When I first met my girlfriend she always said, “I am a different person on holidays, more involved, happier.” My response was, “Go on a holiday and bring that person back.” She has found that “holiday” person hidden inside herself and brought her out, now she is that person all the time.
  5. Act Enthusiastic. Fake it until you make it, sounds corny but it is true. The more you practice enthusiasm, the more enthusiastic you become.

Here are five external things you can do to become enthusiastic about your life:

  1. Make a daily gratitude list. It is easy to become enthusiastic about life if you see on paper in front of you all the things you have to be grateful for.
  2. Create a wellness plan. Enthusiasm and trying to achieve something go hand in hand. If we know where we are going it is easy to become enthusiastic about it. A wellness plan outlines where we want go and how to get there.
  3. Find enthusiastic people to hang with. Enthusiast people have a tendency to rub off on you. Putting more and more enthusiastic people into your life will help keep your enthusiasm level up.
  4. Develop an exercise plan and do it along with a proper sleep routine. Being a couch potato and an insomniac keep our enthusiasm down. Regular exercise and proper sleep help us by providing a body that can become enthusiastic.
  5. Connect with nature. To go to places that connect you with nature lifts your spirits. If you can incorporate nature settings into your exercise routine, like a park, you will find your enthusiasm increases. Failing that, find a beautiful nature picture to look at from the treadmill.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

 

 

 

 

 

Bipolar As Our Primary Problem

40fa8897fa22c48252ea216be7ec63c0

 

No matter what people try to tell you, bipolar is your primary problem or you wouldn’t be reading this blog. That is what this weeks blog is about, that bipolar is our primary problem and mental wellness is our primary goal. If we keep those simple facts in front of us it seems to lessen our struggles.

Bipolar Is Our Primary Problem.

Our Goal is Mental Wellness.

When we let secondary issues become the primary problem and deflect us into thinking our primary goal is to fix that secondary issue is when our lives fall off the rails. Once we are on the road to recovery this line of thinking derails us faster than anything. To believe that my alcoholism, or my codependent tendencies, or my sick need for every one to like me, were the things that destroyed my life is pure fantasy.  My primary, and life destroying issue, was my bipolar disorder, everything else was secondary. It was only when I make these and other issues the primary issue and take my eyes off my primary goal that I have a greater chance of relapse or setting off my triggers. Conversely, it is only by total focus on my goal of mental wellness and managing my primary problem, bipolar, that I am able to maintain my recovery and mental wellness.

This problem of primary mental health issue and secondary addictions has been well studied in the past twenty years with several models being put forward. A lot of these studies can be found online by doing a google search for: “primary mental health issue and secondary addictions,” if you wish to read them.

The concurring theme of this research is that the treatment of the mental health issue and the treatment of the addictions and other secondary issues is usually separate. You are treated here for your mental health issue and treated there for your addiction and other secondary issues.  While the medical community struggles with this issue and how to deal with it. I want to tell those that read this blog, it doesn’t matter if, and how and where you are seeking help, you are ultimately responsible for your own mental health. It would be nice to go to one place and get the answers for out issues but the world is not set up that way, yet.

It is up to all of us, individually, to make our own wellness plan and carry out that plan. It up to us all, individually, to put all the tools we are shown in our own individual tool box. It us also our personal responsibility to build our own tool box. Lose the idea that someone else is going to do this for you.

That is why It should not matter if you receive the answer for this issue here and the answer for that issue over there. It is our personal responsibility to put it all together in one place. That place is inside ourselves so we can practice those things we learned to make them our life habits.

Bipolar disorder is our primary problem and mental wellness is our primary goal, but we have picked up these secondary addictions and other issues. These secondary addictions and other issues are mostly in response to our running away from our primary problem when we did not know how to deal with the pain our bipolar was causing in our lives. I am not saying we do not have to learn to deal with these secondary addictions and other issues. What I am saying is that we cannot get distracted into thinking that these secondary addictions and other issues are our primary focus. They are not and never will be. If I only worked on dealing with my alcoholism and neglected to deal with my bipolar, I would not be able to maintain any form of mental wellness. This would increase my chances of relapsing by a huge margin.

The wording concurring addictions and mental health disorders is creeping into this discussion which I fear will muddy the waters even more. We must always keep our primary issue of bipolar foremost in our minds and all other addictions and issues secondary. These secondary addictions and other issues are for the most part a result of our bipolar disorder, not the cause of it. Therefore, they are secondary addictions and issues at best and definitely not concurrent.

As with any thing I can only relay my own experience on any issue and my experience has been that following a model that bipolar is my primary problem and all other addictions and issues are secondary I am able to keep focusing on my goal of mental wellness and making mental wellness manifest in my life.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday. Like us on Facebook. www.facebook.com/365daysofbipolarcom. Follow us on twitter.

 

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. I hope you enjoy this weeks Blog:

Self Help Videos

 

 

Today is Mental Health Day. It is also Thanksgiving in Canada.

 

download-11

 

Today is Mental Health Day. It is also Thanksgiving in Canada. We have a lot to be thankful for in area of mental health awareness, but also a long way to go. As a bipolar sufferer I want to contribute to the awareness of mental health issues. That is the reason for this blog, to help where I can.

Having just went through a three-day blizzard and living under very dark clouds for a week I have found it difficult to not let the blues in at some level. Realizing that this is part of my illness helps. I also know that I can take the initiative against these feelings and get up and get moving. I know today I do not have to fall down and stay there, I can get up. I know it is ok to fight these feelings they do not have to run my life.

How do I know I can take the initiative against these feelings?  How do I know I can fight these feelings? The reason I know that I can take the initiative and fight these feelings is I have practiced over and over forcing myself to get up. Sometimes it worked and sometimes it didn’t. Then I kept records of when I was able to overcome these feelings and along with my regular mood charts.

I want to share with you what I have learned.

There are proactive things you can do when fall comes around. I started taking Vitamin “D” a number of years ago, a lot of research recommends this.  I take 1000 IU daily. I use light therapy and start it early. I live in an area where in summer daylight is better than 14 hours. In the winter it is less than 8. Once daylight drops to 12 hours I bring out the light.

Mood charting is incredibly important along with journaling. I also suggest checking the weather. For myself, if I see a weather forecast like the last week I know I had better start to mentally prepare. The charts and my journal tell me if my mood is starting to fall.

I no longer lie to myself and in that way I can catch the down turns in my moods early and take action right away. In that way I am less likely to succumb to the feelings.

Is it perfect and wonderful? No it is not. It is after noon and I have still not posted this blog. I have struggled to get the wording for days.  What I can say is that I have learned I can force myself to get up if I catch those feelings early enough. If the feelings have taken over my life, then it is hard to change them.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

Blog of the Week:

http://bipolarmomlife.com/

Creating That Mental Space

between-stimulus-and-response-victor-frankl

The Viktor E. Frankl quote that I used holds the greatest clue I have ever found to learning to manage bipolar. The imputes for this week’s blog was an article on strategies for managing anger written by a Doctor. I could not agree with anything the doctor said in that article. In the past that article would have made me very angry because for me all of the suggested strategies, medication, deep breathing, pause and communicate and the like, never worked in my life and my experience has been that these strategies have not worked for many others. But they are always the go to strategies of the medical profession. I said in the past this article would have made me angry. Did the article make me angry when I read it now? No, it made me sad that things have not changed. The real clue to dealing with all my emotional issues is contained in the Frankl quote

All people, places, situations and things affect our lives, this is called external stimulus. Responding to external stimulus is the clinical definition of being alive. It is how we respond to that external stimulus that defines our lives. For the most part, as bipolar sufferers, we respond to stimulus badly, that is what bipolar does to us and why we can be diagnosed. Once we are stable, triggers are the external stimulus that we continue respond to in a negative way.

No disrespect to Mr. Frankl, but he was definitely not bipolar. If he was he would know that space, he talks about between stimulus and response does not exist in a bipolar person. Also a bipolar person does not respond to stimulus either, they only react to it. If we do not have that space required to respond to stimulus and only instantly react to stimulus, how do we change that? Because that idea of freedom sounds really good. At least that is question I asked myself when I came across that quote. The idea of the existence of that space offered such a ray of hope for me.

How do we go about this change? We need to learn to create a space within ourselves that allows us to think before we react to the stimulus around us. We then need to learn to respond rather than react. Our proper diagnosis and proper medication has provided that stable platform from which we can learn to create this space and learn to respond rather than react. We can learn to create that space from which we can grow and become free with a lot of practice and help from our support team.

Next week we will look at the mechanics of creating that space in which we can live and from which we can grow and become free.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

I am trying a new feature of sharing sites that I have found helpful in my search for information on Bipolar.

Bipolar Site of the Week:

Welcome to the Bipolar Blogger Network!

Two Steps Forward and One Back

 

download

 

Sometimes it feels like we take two steps forward and then one back when it comes to managing our illness. We seem to make progress towards living in the fifth truth of being useful and productive members of society and then our illness steps in and we either take off into mania or fall into depression, rapid cycle or become emotional wrecks causing anything from big ripples to a tidal wave to wash over our lives.

Our bipolar is not going to go away and every now and then it will step up to try and take over our lives again. BP is like our shadow it is always there it just depends on where we stand if our shadow is non-existent or larger than life. The same with our illness, it depends on where we stand mentally and the state of the knowledge we have of ourselves, this determines if our illness will take over our lives or if we can push it back to remain only a non existent shadow that dogs us.

When we have that proper diagnosis and the proper meds that gives us that stable mental platform from which we can start to rebuild our lives as useful and productive people we soon realize we have a lot to learn. The first thing we have to learn is what sets us off, our triggers. This knowledge only comes from experience. Here is where the first truth, the individuality of bipolar comes in. What triggers me may not trigger you and what triggers you may have no effect on me. Lots of things can trigger us and to write a compressive list would look like a multi volume encyclopedia. My experience has been that any external action or event can have triggering effect on anyone. I have a friend who cannot attend concerts because attending a concert sends her into mania, even symphony concerts. Another cannot watch Romance Movies because they cause an instant and deep depression.

As with the criteria that allows diagnosis of our illness, there are some triggers that stand out and we should be aware of:

There are two things that set us up to fail no matter what, I do not consider these triggers and later I explain why:

Alcohol and street drugs are to be avoided at all times. Drinking alcohol or using street drugs is just a sign of selfishness and not wanting to get better. Marijuana is a different story, for some it is a prescribed drug, for others, like myself, it is a deadly poison. Here is the individuality of BP rearing its ugly head again. What may help some may be deadly for others. In my case using weed caused a lot of problems so I do not touch it

Not taking our prescribed medications at all or not taking them as prescribed will guarantee our failure to learn to manage our BP.  That is all I need to say on this subject, if you want that stable platform to build on, take your medications and take them as prescribed. Also build that rapport with your PDoc where you can tell them if a med is not doing for you what the PDoc thought it should. Antidepressants can cause the exact opposite effect and send you into mania. I have experienced that result of antidepressants and spoke of it in an earlier blog.

I have had to learn to dance with my illness. I need to know when my illness was being a bad dance partner and trying to take over the lead. To understand this I have had to study myself and my reactions to people, places, things and situations. In this way I can learn how to respond differently to my triggers.

What are triggers? Triggers are the external issues that cause failure in any management system. If we try to manage anything, people or things, there will be issues that come up that cause the management system to fail. That is just a fact. Having managed companies and not for profits, I know from experience you need two types of management systems, a regular management routine and a crisis management system that can deal with the crisis’ that come up. In the next few posts I will talk about learning personal crisis management. Although I had experience in crisis management on external things, I was surprised how hard is was to practice on my self.

Before I go any further I am going to reiterate that our triggers are our triggers and it requires a lot of personal study to find out what those are. There are some triggers that are pretty much universal and those I will cover here, but we must study ourselves in even greater depth than a scientist studies a lab rat to find what really triggers us.

So tune in next week as we continue this discussion. To be continued……..

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

 

Guilt, Shame, Remorse and Regret, Part Two

quotation-marilyn-j-sorensen-shame-guilt-meetville-quotes-146021

 

The revolving ball of emotions labeled guilt, shame, remorse, and regret, destroy our hope. The unnatural whirl of these emotions keep us locked in the past and fearful of the future. Guilt, shame, remorse, and regret are normal human emotions that are there as warning flags, warning us we have crossed into territory that may be harmful to ourselves. That we have violated something we should not violate within ourselves. Our illness of bipolar as a mood disorder does more than just play with our moods of elation and depression. Bipolar distorts, or denies, all our normal human emotions. This distortion, or denial, means we are clueless as to what we have violated within ourselves and why I stated last week that mostly these emotions express themselves as pain during our illness.

Last week I ended the blog with the statement, “there is another aspect of guilt, or what people confuse with guilt. That is when we make a mistake, or perceived mistake.” Our quote today explains clearly that if we view a mistake as a mistake, we feel guilty when we make them. If we make a mistake and think our world has come to an end, we are ashamed.  There are other aspects that are confused with guilt as well, such as the belief we have fallen short of the perceived expectations of others.  Or we have not met the incredibly high expectations we have placed on ourselves.  In reality this is not guilt, but shame we are feeling. The feelings of guilt and shame are so close together on the range of human emotions that sometimes they can seem inter-changeable. On these issues of error and falling short of expectations it can be hard to tell if we are feeling guilty or ashamed. These issues fall in the grey area of shame and guilt, but shame is really the emotion that is active here if our self worth is called into question. Shame is the topic of this week’s blog.

It is when we have judged ourselves to be inadequate or worthless. When we realize that we are acting as a helpless victim, that there is no longer a grey area. In these situations, we feel ashamed of ourselves. The feeling of shame is directly tied to our personal identity.  We have betrayed who we thought we were and therefore are ashamed of ourselves. This feeling of shame is hard to overcome as we have to change our whole opinion of ourselves, we have to build an whole new self-image. To over come shame requires more than telling ourselves that we are not failures or inadequate. That we have worth and are not a helpless victim of this world.  Those are things we need to tell ourselves, but are just some of the tools to overcome shame. To overcome shame requires drawing a line in the sand and coming to firmly believe one idea or statement, “In the past I may have been that person, but today I am a totally different person.”

It is only by making it a fact that you are doing everything in your power to become that totally different person that will drive that sick feeling of shame from your life. Oh, we will still always make mistakes, but we learn to no longer beat ourselves up over our errors. In fact, I am personally driving the word mistake from my verbal and mental vocabulary, to be replaced by the word errors. Errors, I can learn from. Errors happen, but they are not personal failures.

When it comes to feelings of inadequacy, I may feel inadequate as I learn and practice new skills to battle this illness. What is surprising is that it is actually normal to feel that way, every one feels inadequate when learning new things.

I am never the helpless victim; I always I have the choice in every situation. I may not like my choices, that is not my problem. I just have to choose. Usually help is only a phone call away to help me find my choices. Most importantly, I do something each day to prove my worthiness to myself, through helping others.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Please remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

My Therapist is not working for me

10-short-motivational-quotes-2-638

 

I am a sufferer of BP I,  therefore I can only share my experience and my research into the various facets of bipolar. BP is an illness that is not going to go away, but we can learn to manage this illness with the help of others. One of the most important tools we can add to our tool box is a good therapist, psychologist or counselor.

Therapy is essential for treating bipolar. When I talk of therapy I separate this into two categories so there is no confusion, professional and non professional. This week we are talking about professional therapy.  We should think about seeking out a qualified professional therapist right after our diagnosis and in conjunction with our search to find the right meds to stabilize our minds. If we ask our Psychiatrist, in most cases they will recommend someone.  For the most part Psychiatrists can help in our therapy, but seldom have the time to do real therapy sessions. We need the guidance and the time of a professional trained to unearth, and help us deal with, the deep seated false beliefs and trauma that we have collected during our illness.

I compare the need for a professional therapist to help us deal with our bipolar issues, with the need for a professional guide on an African Safari. Sure you can do go to Africa on your own or in a group and you may even see some things but the experience will be so much better under the guidance of a professional who has an idea of where to look.

I want to talk about some issues that are often raised in conversations about professional therapy.

“My Therapist is not working for me” is a common complaint that is heard all the time. “They do nothing for me” and “I cannot connect” are other forms of the same complaint.

The professional you are seeing is not supposed to do any work, they have gone to school and continue to educate themselves, they are your guide and sounding board. If they did the work it would not help you.

“You can’t hire someone else to do your push-ups for you and expect to benefit.” Jim Rohn.

The job of a professional therapist is to ask the  hard questions, listen carefully and have a really good BS meter.

You are to provide the honest answers and do the homework assigned. If you are not doing homework on yourself between sessions, you are doing yourself a disservice. Simply put, you have to do the work to change – no one else can.

One of the areas that bipolar affects is our ability to connect with people, we do not make friends easily. Then we, as bipolar sufferers, lament that we are having a hard time connecting with our therapist. The development of a real working relationship is hard for us and we need to realize that. We need to reach out to our therapist in a genuine way. In most cases they are actually reaching out to us, we just don’t see it.

Sometimes in the end we just cannot make it work with a particular professional therapist and we need to find a different therapist. This happens sometimes, but the reason to change your therapist should never be that you could not connect, until you tried, or they are making you work too hard or you are not working at all.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Please remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

To be continued next week…………….

It’s in the doing

 

download (7)

 

I woke up today and worked through my morning routine connecting with the universe, I began to think of all the days of depression and isolation that I have gone through where I was unable to do anything. Where even putting cloths on seemed like an insurmountable task. I can only describe this as the “Empty” time, because I was empty inside. I think we can all relate to that “Empty” feeling.
That “Emptiness” is a rare feeling for me, today, because of the faith I have grown. It is an absolute falsehood that the opposite fear is faith. This is definitely not true. The opposite of fear is peace of mind. Faith is the vehicle which gets you from fearful to that peace of mind we all seek.  Today my faith has a foundation of hope and gratitude, based on an unshakable belief that I can achieve mental wellness. My faith tells me that if I do as I am supposed to do, when I am supposed to do it, everything will work out. Maybe not the way I envision it, but in a way that will be good for me.  Today, I know, my faith will give me the spiritual character, mental strength and emotional control to balance my life. Today, my faith keeps me doing – my job, my writing and helping others. My faith takes me out of bed, puts my cloths on and out the door to see how I can be useful to this world I live in.
It was in reading Oswald Chambers statements on “Taking initiative against depression” that changed the way I looked a depression. Depression was not something I had to put up with, it was something I could walk out of if I took the initiative.  In reading the words of Oswald Chambers I summoned what little faith I had, I got out of bed, had something to eat and I did the dishes. The next day I got up, got dressed, had something to eat, did the dishes and made the bed. The third day I got up, I had a shower, got dressed, had something to eat, did the dishes and made the bed. As my doing grew, my faith grew with it.

You see Oswald Chambers, in his words on “Taking initiative against depression,” did not say great things or offer great promises, the part that caught my eye was “get up and eat”, so I did.
I will share with you an exercise that I started doing to take the initiative against depression when that feeling started to take hold. Write down at the end of the first day at least five positive things you did, trying to add one or more things each day. You do this for a month. You will find that at the end of the month you have written proof that the more positive things you do the better you feel. That gives you hope and that hope becomes faith, a faith that If I keep taking the initiative against this depression I will find it easier to walk out of it. It is up to you to live your life, Oswald Chambers wrote, “If we were never depressed we would not be alive. Only material things do not suffer depression.”

Depression is a normal human emotion and there are things in this world that cause us to be depressed, but we do not have to stay there.

Our battle is with our minds, not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Please remember our battle will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

Please subscribe to this blog, or check back every Monday, as we look at the truths of living with and managing our Bi-Polar disorder.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

 

 

365daysofbipolar is one year old

 

 

download10

On February 20th it has been one year, 365 days, since I started this blog. It is my fervent prayer that I have encouraged someone with my writings thus far and hope to encourage many more in the future.  2015 was a growth year in knowledge, both technical and spiritual. I want thank all those that have followed me and encouraged me this past year.

Rather than talking about a topic on Bi-Polar today I want to talk about my plans for 365daysofbipolar and the site name 365daysofbipolar.com.  Recently someone asked me where the name 365daysofbipolar came from.  Actually they said. “Where did the idea for the name 365daysofbipolar came from, it seems silly?”  A year and bit ago I started a project to write a daily meditation book for Bi-Polar sufferers (it takes a long time to write a book) and I came up with 365daysofbipolar as the tittle. From that point I started to use 365daysofbipolar as a brand name in my crusade to encourage other BP sufferer’s on to the path of mental wellness through experience, strength and hope.

365daysofbipolar.com, the blog, has been joined by 365daysofbiplar@gmail.com to enable better communication. I plan to make this site better and more interactive as my technical skill increases and my BP resources grow.  I am hoping the book of meditations entitled 365daysofbipolar will be published this fall. I have also had some people express interest in my doing a YouTube channel after my short foray into alternative radio.  I am looking in to this and if this becomes a reality, the 365daysofbipolar YouTube channel will be launched as well. I will post more announcements on these projects on Facebook.

One of the greatest challenges of this last year has been finding my voice and putting forth my authentic self. To be true to myself I want to state clearly what I believe:

I believe that, as Dr. Dwayne Dyer says, “We are spirits having a human experience.”

“Bi-Polar is a rupture of communication between the human spirit and the human mind.  Medication stabilizes our mind allowing us to heal that rupture and strengthen our spirit to be mentally well.”

In 2016 and onward there will be a lot of information on how to heal and strengthen the spirit presented. The main focus 365daysofbipolar will always remain to encourage others on to, and continue on, the path of mental wellness.

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.