365daysofbipolar.com

Where We Learn To Connect With Our Authentic Selves.

Month: April 2020

VITAMIN C MORE THAN AN IMMUNE BOOSTER FOR THOSE WITH BIPOLAR

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

Vitamin C is more than an immune booster.

To avoid Covid – 19 we are encouraged to boost our immune systems. The simplest immune booster is vitamin C. For those of us with bipolar Vitamin C has other surprising benefits. Studies are showing that Vitamin C has many benefits in brain function and in mood stabilization.

Studies indicate that Vitamin C does the following:

  1. Improves cognitive function.
  2. Reduces anxiety
  3. Reduces Mania
  4. Strengthens Neurons and Neuron connectors
  5. Reduces depression
  6. It helps protect against toxins.
  7. It helps the body reduce its load of vanadium, a mineral that adversely influences bipolar disorder. 

Other information studies have indicated.

In a Brazilian study, it was found that Vitamin C may be as effective as Fluoxetine (Prozac) in combating depression.

In New Zealand studies it was proven that most people in the western world are Vitamin C deficient (North Americans especially so).

Sources of Vitamin C:

  • Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, and tangerines
  • Cantaloupe
  • Kiwis
  • Papayas
  • Guavas
  • Strawberries
  • Dark leafy greens (kale, mustard greens, spinach, beet greens, turnip greens, Swiss chard, rainbow chard, collard greens, watercress, dandelion greens, purslane)
  • Broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts
  • Red cabbage

With the new information on the link between inflammation and bipolar disorder these foods of the nightshade family are proven to be inflammatory but are good sources of Vitamin C for people who are not concerned with inflammation.

  • Bell peppers (yellow bell peppers provide the most vitamin C and green bell peppers provide the least)
  • Tomatoes and tomato juice
  • Red and green hot chili pepper

Vitamin C is destroyed by heat and air. Food should be eaten raw or cooked lightly and consumed quickly after cutting or juicing.

Recommended Dosages of Vitamin C.

Humans cannot make Vitamin C; we need to get these dosages from our diet. Smokers need higher dosages of Vitamin C.

Males & Females: 1-3 years 15 mg

Males & Females: 4-8 years 25 mg

Males & Females: 9-13 years 45 mg

Males: 14-18 years 75 mg

Females: 14-18 years 65 mg

Males:19+ years 90 mg

Females: 19+ years 75 mg

For bipolar disorder sufferers, a minimum dosage of 1000 mg daily is recommended and should not exceed 2,000 mg daily. Studies have shown that taking over 2,000 mg daily can cause nausea and diarrhea. These high dosages are unlikely to be obtained through food alone and Vitamin C supplements may be required.

As with any change to your bipolar management strategy you should discuss adding vitamin C in consultation with your professional support team.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

Naka Platinum PRO Pure Vitamin C 1000 mg Delayed Release 100% Vegetarian – BONUS Size 180 Veggie Capsules (150+30)

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/search/ref=as_li_qf_sp_sr_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=365daysofbipo-20&keywords=Naka Platinum PRO Pure Vitamin C 1000 mg Delayed Release 100% Vegetarian – BONUS Size 180 Veggie Capsules (150+30)&index=aps&camp=15121&creative=330641&linkCode=ur2&linkId=366f0a806d80c93c69ab2b727924524f

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Single Mom Chapters

MAYBE HERO’S AND MENTORS ARE WHAT WE NEED IN THIS UNCERTAIN TIME

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

In this time of uncertainty hero’s and mentors maybe what we need for our mental health. They are out there and it is our job to find them.

What is a hero and how to find one?

A hero is that torch that you can follow. The spark that ignites the fire that says if they can, I can too. The biographies of the great men and women are waiting on the shelves of libraries, bookstores, and online in Wikipedia for you to find the hero that speaks to you in a way you can understand and want to follow.

My current hero is Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Why would I choose him as a hero? Because when most people are winding down their working lives he was just getting started. In my case after battling this illness unsuccessfully for decades my life is just getting started in my 60’s as well. If he had quit when he turned 65 and settled for his little pension, we would never have known who he was. He did not settle, and I do not want to settle either. He had something to offer the world, a secret recipe of herbs and spices, and I would like to think I have something to offer in my writing of children’s stories and this blog.

There was one other thing about Col. Sanders that his biography shed a light on. He had failed a lot in his life. His biographer John Ed Pearce wrote, “[Sanders] had encountered repeated failure largely through bullheadedness, a lack of self-control, impatience, and a self-righteous lack of diplomacy.”

I could really relate to that line as it pretty much summed up my bipolar life except the fear.

What is a mentor and how to find one?

A mentor is someone who has trod the path that you are on and can keep you from some of the errors that they have suffered through. The best mentors have no ulterior motives and only sincerely want the best for you. It is a relationship like none other in this day and age. A good mentor is not a bank, a taxi, or your savior. They are just a person who will never turn you away no matter what you have done.

My current mentor and I have welded a relationship over the last number of years and even in the depths of my last episode in 2010 never once turned me away. I just refused to listen to wise words because I was so wrapped up in my illness that nothing penetrated. We can laugh about that today.

How do you find a mentor? First, you must put yourself in a position to meet one. Attending support groups is usually a good place to start. Although many who attend support groups fall away as they reach a feeling of wellness, some stay to give back to the people who are still suffering. Those are the potential mentors. With the advent of online forums and chats finding someone you can forge a long distant relationship with has also become an option. I have a few people that I mentor through email. There is only one requirement to having a mentor and that is honesty. If you cannot be honest don’t bother. For the few that I mentor face to face the first thing I say is “I don’t care if you lie to me, just don’t lie to yourself.”

There are many tools to be found on the path to mental wellness. Two of the best are finding a hero and a mentor. They are the fire and the forge that can weld you into a person of integrity and keep you on the path to mental wellness.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Madelyn Chung

https://www.madelynchung.com/blog/2019/4/26/i-showered-today-1

LET US TALK – SELF-CARE

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

During this time of uncertainty, we have a great opportunity. An opportunity to work on ourselves. To learn good stewardship of our minds, bodies, and spirits.

My basic premise, that bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it, is also true of Self-Care. The first thing I have to admit is I changed the word self-care to stewardship for my life. I am the steward of my life. My life’s one and only caretaker.
Why did I change the word I use to define caring for myself? A mentor made the greatest observation when discussing the topic of self-care. “Pretend you are a beautiful flower, say an orchid. Do you know how to take care of a beautiful flower, like an orchid?”

Of course, I had no idea how to take care of a flower or any other plant at that time. That was his point. Self-care is not something we inherently know how to do. We have to learn what works for us.

For me, taking the approach that I was outside myself and tending to me like I was a plant I knew nothing about really helped me in the beginning.

To be a good steward of the orchid I want my life to become I needed to develop some skills and knowledge.

  1. To learn what the orchid likes, wants and needs.
  2. To know what can attack the orchid or reduce its life.
  3. To not only love the plant but love caring for the plant.

This interprets into knowing, protecting and loving ourselves and loving the act of caring for ourselves when we apply this to our persons. The thing is we have no idea about these things, and we have to learn them.

One other issue that caused me to change my terminology from self-care to stewardship is that this has allowed me to shut out all the noise that has become the self-care industry. Don’t get me wrong there is fantastic information out there under this topic but lighting candles and taking bubble baths did nothing for me. A lot of what is sold as self-care is just being momentarily good to ourselves and has no long-term effect on us. Self-care is a topic is sliding towards instant gratification rather than long term results. If you are the steward of something it instantly connotates you are in this for the long haul.

This is a difficult time for all of us. To help us get through this we need to be good to ourselves and love each other. If this post and this blog can help you learn to be good stewards of your mind, body, and spirit I am overjoyed.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

Self-Care for the Real World: Practical self-care advice for everyday life.

https://amzn.to/2xzvGqG

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Lachlan Brown.

https://hackspirit.com/self-love

OVERCOMING BOREDOM

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and the knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Being Bored Is Different Than Feeling Lonely:

The feelings of loneliness and boredom are often confused but are actually two totally different emotions or feelings.

Loneliness defined: To feel lonely one does not have to alone. The feeling of loneliness is when one perceives that they lack social acceptance, or the quality or quantity of their social sphere is lacking. Loneliness is a perception or state of mind.

Boredom defined:  Being bored is expressing a lack of interest in one’s current activity or surroundings. Boredom can also be caused by the inability to concentrate on the activity or surroundings.

The False Beliefs That Causes Boredom:

Boredom, like loneliness, is based on perception There is a perception problem when the feeling of boredom enters our lives Mainly our boredom is founded in one of two false perceptions.

The first false perception is best described in this quote.

“Boredom is the conviction that you can’t change – the shriek of unused capacities.” Saul Bellow. We feel that something can’t change, or we are stuck in a hopeless situation.

How Do We Overcome Boredom?

We have defined boredom and learned what false perception causes this feeling of boredom. What do we need to do to actually overcome boredom? Well, that depends, but I have found one constant. To overcome boredom requires conscious effort. Without the willingness to put in the effort to overcome the false perception you are running under; you and your environment will stay the same.

During this time of disrupted routines and forced isolation boredom is a real possibility for many us. For those of us with bipolar disorder, this boredom can lead to deeper issues.

We are bored because we feel ourselves or our environment cannot change, and for the next while it probably won’t, Saul Bellow offered the solution in his quote – Tap into your unused capacities as they are shrieking for use. You can also enlarge your capacities. Examples of these are endless.

Henry David Thoreau gave the best quote on mans capacities. “But man’s capacities have never been measured; nor are we to judge of what he can do by any precedents, so little have been tried.”

This is my list of using my capacities and growing some new ones.

  1. I am writing more. I love to write and create worlds and stories. So, I am doing more of this.
  2. I am cooking more and heathier meals. We have to eat, and most restaurants seem to be closed.
  3. I am researching more topics for this blog.
  4. I am connecting with people on skype, zoom, text and phone.
  5. I signed up to Duolingo to learn Spanish and Italian.
  6. I am taking a free online course to improve this blog.
  7. I am practicing gratitude by consciously looking for things to be grateful for.
  8. I set a goal to read one book a week.
  9. I am reading more blogs written by others.
  10. I am learning things from YouTube.

I hope this list gives you some ideas you can try to stave off boredom or sparks your own ideas. Remember that if you are feeling bored you are not using your capacities to live a joyous life even in this unprecedented time.

I pray you stay safe and well

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

I have used this book as a guide to overcoming adversities of other kinds and have found it to be a great reference to return to.

Overcoming Adversities: Going Beyond Frustration, Resentment, Depression, Exhaustion and Boredom…

https://amzn.to/2yED0S8

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melvin G McInnis MD FRCPsych.

This is a topic that is very real for bipolar sufferers at this time and beyond my ability to write about. Please read this article.

HAPPY BELATED WORLD BIPOLAR DAY

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

“At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of. They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.” Carrie Fisher

Happy World Bipolar Day, although slightly late. The theme of the day was “Strength for today and hope for tomorrow.”

Unfortunately, with the world as it is all the events that had been planned were canceled. But having events is not what this day is about for me. I look at this day as a historical landmark.

World Bipolar Day was established on March 30, 2014, on the birthday of one of the most famous bipolar sufferers, Vincent Van Gough. Although in Vincent’s time he would have been diagnosed with circular insanity. Which was how they were describing the cycle of mania and depression at that time. It wasn’t until 1921 that the term and diagnosis of manic depression was established. In 1980 the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder was established and 34 years later a day was designated.

I firmly believe that in all of history, if you are to have bipolar disorder this is the best time to have this diagnosis. The stigma around this illness is diminishing. No, it is not completely gone, but compared to when I was properly diagnosed in 2009 the stigma is not nearly as damaging. The medication and other tools to battle this illness are improving almost daily. Support, both professional and non-professional, is more readily available. The amount of information available to the bipolar sufferer to help them cope with all aspects of this illness is amazing.

On World Bipolar Day 2020 we have lots to celebrate. I encourage you to celebrate the advances in treating this illness, not just on March 30th, but every day.

Although many people still struggle horribly with the illness, there is hope. There may never be a cure for bipolar disorder, but bipolar management is becoming easier and easier with each advance.  The path to managing your bipolar disorder is hard in the beginning as you learn the new skills and routines that proper management requires. Just remember hard does not mean impossible and no one is doing this perfectly. No one expects you to do this perfectly either. As Carrie Fisher said, “if you are doing it at all you deserve a medal.”

Be proud, not ashamed.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

The Bipolar Workbook, Second Edition: Tools for Controlling Your Mood Swings.

https://amzn.to/2R0E5tN

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by the team at Secret Law of Attraction.