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Where We Learn To Connect With Our Authentic Selves.

Category: Emotional Wellness (Page 1 of 9)

THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENT TO CHANGE – WILLINGNESS

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

https://365daysofbipolar.com/privacy-policy/

The Essential Element OF Change – Willingness.

“You create willingness.” Meir Ezra.

Last week I posted 10 ways to change your life, this week I write on the essential element to implement change.

Recently I had a conversation with someone I have known for years. I noticed a change in this person and commented on it. They smiled and made the most interesting statement,

“For the first time ever, I am willing to change and do the work required.”

For Many Of Us Change Is Hard.

It could be from limiting beliefs or false expectations, but for some reason change is difficult. For my friend, it turned out to be a combination of both, a false expectation that things would be handed to them or come easily. This created a false belief that life is easy. Blessed with incredibly good looks, above average intelligence, and a winning personality my friend got everything they wanted without effort. At least the superficial things. They never had to struggle and fight for anything.

When confronted with any difficulty, and holding those expectations and beliefs, avoidance had always been the way to go. Unfortunately, real life is not easy and at some point, you have to develop the life skills and character traits to deal with it. That is what happened to my friend. They were confronted with an issue that required them to either learn those skills and develop those traits or lose something especially important to them.  But first, they had to become willing.

What Is Willingness?

According to the Oxford Dictionary – “Willingness is a state of being prepared to do something, a readiness.”

How Much Willingness Do You Need?

This is not a stupid a question as it sounds, because, by the definition cited above, willingness is a state of being. How much willingness do you have to generate to be ready to do something, to ignite that state of being?

Willingness may just come from realizing there is hope in that change that you are confronted with. Hope for that “Ducky” life we all crave. Sometimes hope is all you need to create the willingness to change.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Bryan Falchuk

https://bryanfalchuk.com/blog/humility-doesnt-take-humiliation

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10 WAYS TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

10 Ways To Change Your Life.

“If you truly feel that self-esteem and motivation have to happen first before you can make changes in your life, then we’ll probably be sharing walkers at a retirement home as we talk over what might have been.” Shannon Alder.

I honestly believed that I needed to find the motivation to catapult me into the life I wanted. Truthfully, I was far to close to the retirement home before I figured out there is only one thing that will get you to the life you want – ACTION. I hope one or more of these action ideas can help you to get moving toward the life you want.

  1. Get off the couch or out of bed. As a bipolar sufferer, I spent a lot of time stuck to the couch or glued to the bed waiting for the motivation to come. I can tell you; it does not work that way.
  2. Practice Gratitude (Say Thank You). Yes, you can be grateful on the couch or in bed, but it seems to work better when you are up and, in the world, where you can see the things you are grateful for. To say I am grateful for something is fine, but to say thank you for those things acknowledges that a power greater than you or even another person made all of those things you are grateful for possible.
  3. Create A Dream Or Vision Board. Creating something that focuses you on the life you want has a power that is hard to describe. There are many better teachers on creating these boards than I will ever be. Check the blog of the week for a better teacher on how to construct a dream board.
  4. Decide You Want To Change. A decision is all that it takes to make a change. If you are like me, a decision to change will not carry you far. Years ago, I learned that the word decision did not have any weight with me so when I see the word decision, I automatically change it to “Commitment.” The word commitment carries more weight with me and causes me to make the situation more serious. For me, I made a commitment to change and that commitment has carried me an exceptionally long way.
  5. Practice Acceptance, Especially On Yourself. I know this sounds silly; how can you possibly accept yourself as you are right now? The starting point for the life you want is right here, right now. That life does not have any other place to start. Anything else is just putting it off. Something we as bipolar sufferers are masters at. Learning to accept yourself just as you are is one of the greatest tools to use in creating the life you want. Creating the life you want is not easy, the sooner you learn to accept yourself warts and all the easier it will be to accept you may make some mistakes along the way.
  6. Build Better Habits.  For years I believed that goal setting was the way to change. The truth for me was I did not have the foundation to achieve the goals. That foundation proved to be better habits. Understanding that every habit, good or bad, is learned went a long way to helping me as I developed better habits for the life I wanted. With my bipolar disorder, I learned that it takes four to six months for a habit to stick. This is four to six times longer than the twenty to thirty days that the popular literature states. Also practicing number five as I developed those habits made a big difference as I no longer needed to do things perfectly. I just needed to do them.
  7. Create A Purpose For Your Life. There is research that shows having a purpose increases overall well being and life satisfaction. For me, living the life I want, that “Ducky” life, revolves around living with and managing my bipolar disorder and helping others to do the same.
  8. Commit To Learning. “Don’t wish it was easier, wish you were better. Don’t wish for less problems, wish for more skills. Don’t wish for less challenge, wish for more wisdom.” Jim Rohn. This quote sums up the truth about getting the life you want. You have to learn to be better, to have the skills to tackle the problems, and have the experiences to grow wisdom. I always say, “the more of bipolar management is learning.”
  9. Create Inspiration Around You. When I wake up the first thing, I see is an inspiring quote. When I sit at my computer to write I am surrounded by inspiring, uplifting signs and symbols in for the form of quotes and my vision board. My entire space, from the bedroom, the bathroom, the kitchen, and my office, does nothing but inspire me to keep going.
  10. Pay The Price. Change requires you to become willing to give up something. I learned a formula from Youtuber Sunny Lenarduzzi that really helped me to grasp this concept.

What you want + What you are willing to work for – Any distractions that stand in your way = The Life You Want.

I wanted a life that was worth living and I was willing to work for that life. I found that to get that life I had to focus and anything, people, places, things, or situations, that distracted me from that focus had to go. Harsh but true.

Here is the surprising thing about this journey, Self-esteem, and motivation do not come first as we seemed to believe. I found that as I progressed towards the life I wanted and I changed, my self-esteem grew, and I am motivated most of the time. This proves that you have to act in order to get self-esteem and motivation. I still have bipolar, and I manage it fairly well, but it still strikes at inopportune times and in new and surprising ways. That is OK because I have, or can learn, the skills to deal with it.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Christie Inge

This is the best information on how to make a vision board.

MY STORY OF HOW I LEARNED TO LOVE MYSELF

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Before We Start This Week:

Please check out The Blog of The Week. Which this week it is not a blog at all but a link to a Facebook group that I feel shares many of the same values as I try to express in this blog.

My Story of Learning To Love Myself.

In my own life and in talking to many bipolar sufferers there seem to be common thoughts running through our minds. “We feel worthless, useless, and hopeless”, “We feel guilt, shame and remorse for the things we have done and have lost”, “we feel like we missed some important piece of life information.” “We feel like imposters.” “We feel like we are not enough,” “We feel like chameleons, forever changing who we are to fit in with others.” We feel used and abused by others.” “We feel responsible for everyone and everything,” “We feel shunned and ostracized by loved ones and society at large,” “We don’t trust ourselves.” “We have let ourselves down too often.”

It is hard to love yourself when those are the predominant words running through your mind at any given time.

“It Is All About What You Are Feeding Yourself.”

I thought “it is all about what you are feeding yourself” the dumbest statement I had ever heard in relation to the mind. Whoever heard of feeding your mind? The truth is your mind is a sponge and if you do not feed it properly it will feed itself. Where do you think all those negative statements come from?

It took a long time for me to grasp this concept:

To Grow From Incredible Self Hatred To Really And Truly Loving Yourself Takes Time And The Right Fertilizer.

Before my last bipolar implosion, I had built a small market garden. To improve the soil, I added tons of manure to the land. I did not realize that I also added tons of manure to my thoughts over my life as well.

I held on to every hurtful and negative statement that was said to me and about me as if they were golden nuggets. I could recite them and did all day long, sometimes out loud. If you have bipolar you know exactly what I am talking about.

Manure is not the proper fertilizer for your mind.

After that last bipolar disorder implosion, I realized things needed to change, but it took a while to realize the main thing that needed changing was me and the way I thought.

I Felt Like I Missed Some Important Piece Of Life Information.

I came to realize that I did not have the tools or skills to change. The way I thought was the biggest problem. Bad experiences in education led me to believe that I was unteachable. I have learned this is not an uncommon way of thinking for a lot of bipolar sufferers. Which adds to our self – loathing.

Then I learned the truth of this quote from Buddha, “When the student is ready the teacher will appear.”

I was ready and I wanted to change but I had no idea how. I was willing to do anything to change and out of nowhere people and situations arose to help me change.

I Learned The Secret That Worked For Me.

The secret that worked for me was something I was already doing but in a not helpful way. The secret even had a name, it was affirmations.

Earlier I said, “I held on to every hurtful and negative statement that was said to me and about me as if they were golden nuggets. I could recite them and did all day long, sometimes out loud.”

I did not know that technically I was affirming all of that negativity about myself.

Teachers, as I said, seemed to appear from everywhere and the teacher that taught me the truth of how affirmations really worked was the late Mohamed Ali who said, “It’s the repetition of affirmations that leads to belief. And once that belief becomes a deep conviction, things begin to happen.”

I had a deep conviction that I did not love myself. Actually, I was full of self-loathing. To turn that around I had to tell myself something different until I was convinced that what I was telling myself was true.

Mantra Time.

I came up with this mantra that has transformed my life. “I love myself; I love my life; I love my job.” But it started out as “I love myself.” The rest came later.

Mowing The Lawn, A Story.

My last bipolar implosion landed me almost on the street, but an old friend took pity on me and allowed me to live in his spare bedroom. In the bathroom, I pasted “I Love Myself” on the mirror. Although I read that statement out loud every morning and said it to myself often, I did not believe it.

One day I was mowing the lawn and as the gas mower was going, I would chant “I love myself.” I thought if the mower were running no one would hear me. But when I shut off the mower the neighbors shouted back; We love you too.”

Kind of embarrassing, but I will never forget the feeling I had. If I love myself others will live me too.” That feeling stuck and made me work even harder.

I recited, “I love myself” all day long, in my mind as my predominant thought and out loud as often as I could. Since most of the time on my job I worked alone I would say my mantra over and over out loud.

I lived with my friend for two years and over those two years my mantra of, “I love myself; I love my life; I love my job.” Not only came into being, but I came to believe every word of it and become firmly convinced that every word was truly how I felt about myself and my life.

Today I do love myself. I do love the life I am living, and I do love my job.

And what of my mantra. When things are quiet my mantra automatically starts to play in my head and it even set itself to music. So, my mantra plays over and over in my mind to the tune of Neil Youngs “Southern Man.” This is much better than the manure my mind used to automatically conjure up.

I am firmly convinced that if you do this as well you would transform your self-loathing to self love.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in what you have to say.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Sharilyn Gilmore

https://www.facebook.com/groups/2520960211495674/

WHY WE SHOULD LISTEN TO OUR BODIES.

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

As Bipolar Sufferers We Do Not Listen To What Is Important.

I have never met a bipolar sufferer who does not have some type of Gastrointestinal issue if not several of them. In my case, I have ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome.

Not only that but heart or circulation issues are as prevalent as gastrointestinal issues. I also have high blood pressure.

Why is that? The short answer is we do not listen to our bodies and then suffer the consequences when our body begins to rebel causing us pain and other side effects of neglect.

Bipolar Disorder Makes Us Externally Focused.

Bipolar disorder makes us believe that external things are the cause of our discomfort while our body is screaming that our problem is inside us.

It is like those old horror movies where all the teenagers are looking out the windows for the scary monster and the scary monster is standing behind a group of them in the house.

Every week I end this blog with the statement, “Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.” I say this because bipolar disorder does not want us to look inside ourselves to find what is wrong. Bipolar disorder wants us to look everywhere else.

The Mind, Body, Emotion Conflict.

Where do our emotions come from? Is it our mind or our bodies? Could it be both or is there something else?

Those questions were posed to me about six years ago and sent me on a journey that is still ongoing. But I want to share what I have learned so far.

To me, it was obvious that our mind does not generate or control our emotions, especially the bipolar mind. To me, that meant our body must generate and control our emotions.

Then I read, “Three Brains” by Karen Jenson N.D., the subtitle of which is, “How the Heart, Brain, and Gut Influence Mental Health and Identity. When I came across this book, I was already convinced that bipolar disorder created an identity crisis. This book showed me not only did bipolar create an identity crisis but caused a conflict between our heart brain and our gut-brain.

Why We Should Listen To Our Bodies.

As the book states, we have three brains, two in our bodies and one in our head. Once you understand this it is not hard to figure out that there is more brainpower in our bodies than in our head. That makes our bodies worth listening to. In this light it also quite easy to understand the statement, “your body is quite intelligent.”

If you have a mind that is controlled by bipolar disorder it is even more important that you learn how to let the brains in your body take over.

What Of Emotions?

Bipolar disorder affects our moods and emotions. That is what seems to control us. For many of us, all we really want is emotional control. If we could control our emotions, we would have everything, right?

The fact is we will never have real emotional control without aligning our three brains or at least getting them to work together instead of being in a state of miscommunication.

It Is Imperative We Turn Inwards.

If you agree that it is now time to listen to the two brains in our bodies, how do we do it? Our body has always talked to us and even if you have not listened in decades your body is still talking to you. The problem is we do not understand its language.

 Our mind talks to us in words, our bodies talk in sensations and feelings.

We have to become open to that language.

The other issue is that of trust. We have never trusted our heart or gut. They seem to have led us astray way too many times and betrayed our trust. What if I told you your heart and gut never lied to you? Your bipolar mind wrongly interpreted the signals.

This brings us to my favorite word in bipolar management, “learning.”

To effectively listen to your body, you have to learn the language your body speaks in and even more importantly you have to trust what your body is saying. This will not happen overnight.

3 Simple Things To Start Tuning Into Your Body.

  1. Stop – for a minute stop and relax.
  2. Breath Deep – Take a few deep breaths.
  3. Acknowledge your feelings – The language of our bodies is feelings and sensations. If we acknowledge what we are feeling but do not respond. We will slowly learn to filter out the noise and hear what our body is saying.

The journey to reconnect with the language of your body is both interesting and worthwhile. The benefits are a healthier and happier you. This is a short blog post that I hope will interest you in embarking on your own journey of learning to connect your three brains, mind, heart, and gut and listening to your body.

There are many great teachers on how to listen to your body and in the last few years, many therapists are learning and passing on this skill. As a starting point, I have put a post in the Blog of the Week section below.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Amy Kurtz

https://wanderlust.com/journal/actually-means-listen-body

WHEN THINGS ARE NOT WORKING OUT, SOMETIMES WE NEED A NEW STARTING POINT.

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

WHEN THINGS ARE NOT WORKING OUT, SOMETIMES WE HAVE TO FIND A NEW STARTING POINT.

I believe that bipolar disorder is as individual as the people who suffer from it. This means that this illness affects all us of differently and we not only have to find what works. But what works for each of us as individuals.

This is my story and I hope that some of the things I learned may help you.

The first step to finding that new starting point is to make sure you are using the right words to define it.

As a bipolar sufferer, I spent a long time in a life that was not worth living. Nothing was working out in my life in any area. To find the life I wanted I have had to find a different starting point for many areas of my life. To find that new starting point I first had to redefine many words. Keeping the definitions that my bipolar mind told me was correct kept me in the same mindset and unable to find that new starting point.

If you redefine the things that drive, you.

For most of us when we think of what drives us two words that come quickly to mind, ambition, and success. In redefining one of those words I found a new starting point that has completely changed my life.

Like most people, I have always been ambitious and wanted to succeed. Unfortunately, I failed miserably at everything I tried. Why? The short answer is I had the wrong definition for the word ambition and therefore the wrong thoughts and feelings driving my ambition and thwarting success. 

That was my first lesson: the thoughts and feelings a word in your mind generates have an incredible effect on the result.

My idea of ambition had me believing that I would get something material out of it. The truth for me turned out to be that if I made my ambition to be useful to others, I always got a good feeling and not necessarily a material gain.

Over the past decade, since I made being useful my goal, I have found many ways to put that into practice.

Ambition has nothing to do with success.

Success for me was learning to manage my bipolar disorder. I have been fairly successful at that. My life is no longer ruled 24/7 by my bipolar mood swings and my bipolar mind. That does not mean that I no longer have bipolar symptoms, they show up and often at the most inopportune times.

I have made managing my bipolar disorder job one each and every day. Learning to recognize the subtle signs and triggers that bring on my bipolar disorder.

The byproduct of making managing my bipolar disorder job one is I have held a job for a decade with minimal sick time, consistently written this blog for five years, and written two children’s books. If I had not made bipolar management job one, I would be able to point to any of those accomplishments as a gauge to mental wellness.

I encourage you to find that new starting point that will lead to a life worth living.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Hilary Jacobs Hendal

https://www.salon.com/2018/07/22/what-toxic-stress-does-to-a-childs-brain-and-how-to-heal-it

MAYBE HERO’S AND MENTORS ARE WHAT WE NEED IN THIS UNCERTAIN TIME

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

In this time of uncertainty hero’s and mentors maybe what we need for our mental health. They are out there and it is our job to find them.

What is a hero and how to find one?

A hero is that torch that you can follow. The spark that ignites the fire that says if they can, I can too. The biographies of the great men and women are waiting on the shelves of libraries, bookstores, and online in Wikipedia for you to find the hero that speaks to you in a way you can understand and want to follow.

My current hero is Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Why would I choose him as a hero? Because when most people are winding down their working lives he was just getting started. In my case after battling this illness unsuccessfully for decades my life is just getting started in my 60’s as well. If he had quit when he turned 65 and settled for his little pension, we would never have known who he was. He did not settle, and I do not want to settle either. He had something to offer the world, a secret recipe of herbs and spices, and I would like to think I have something to offer in my writing of children’s stories and this blog.

There was one other thing about Col. Sanders that his biography shed a light on. He had failed a lot in his life. His biographer John Ed Pearce wrote, “[Sanders] had encountered repeated failure largely through bullheadedness, a lack of self-control, impatience, and a self-righteous lack of diplomacy.”

I could really relate to that line as it pretty much summed up my bipolar life except the fear.

What is a mentor and how to find one?

A mentor is someone who has trod the path that you are on and can keep you from some of the errors that they have suffered through. The best mentors have no ulterior motives and only sincerely want the best for you. It is a relationship like none other in this day and age. A good mentor is not a bank, a taxi, or your savior. They are just a person who will never turn you away no matter what you have done.

My current mentor and I have welded a relationship over the last number of years and even in the depths of my last episode in 2010 never once turned me away. I just refused to listen to wise words because I was so wrapped up in my illness that nothing penetrated. We can laugh about that today.

How do you find a mentor? First, you must put yourself in a position to meet one. Attending support groups is usually a good place to start. Although many who attend support groups fall away as they reach a feeling of wellness, some stay to give back to the people who are still suffering. Those are the potential mentors. With the advent of online forums and chats finding someone you can forge a long distant relationship with has also become an option. I have a few people that I mentor through email. There is only one requirement to having a mentor and that is honesty. If you cannot be honest don’t bother. For the few that I mentor face to face the first thing I say is “I don’t care if you lie to me, just don’t lie to yourself.”

There are many tools to be found on the path to mental wellness. Two of the best are finding a hero and a mentor. They are the fire and the forge that can weld you into a person of integrity and keep you on the path to mental wellness.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Madelyn Chung

https://www.madelynchung.com/blog/2019/4/26/i-showered-today-1

OVERCOMING BOREDOM

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and the knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Being Bored Is Different Than Feeling Lonely:

The feelings of loneliness and boredom are often confused but are actually two totally different emotions or feelings.

Loneliness defined: To feel lonely one does not have to alone. The feeling of loneliness is when one perceives that they lack social acceptance, or the quality or quantity of their social sphere is lacking. Loneliness is a perception or state of mind.

Boredom defined:  Being bored is expressing a lack of interest in one’s current activity or surroundings. Boredom can also be caused by the inability to concentrate on the activity or surroundings.

The False Beliefs That Causes Boredom:

Boredom, like loneliness, is based on perception There is a perception problem when the feeling of boredom enters our lives Mainly our boredom is founded in one of two false perceptions.

The first false perception is best described in this quote.

“Boredom is the conviction that you can’t change – the shriek of unused capacities.” Saul Bellow. We feel that something can’t change, or we are stuck in a hopeless situation.

How Do We Overcome Boredom?

We have defined boredom and learned what false perception causes this feeling of boredom. What do we need to do to actually overcome boredom? Well, that depends, but I have found one constant. To overcome boredom requires conscious effort. Without the willingness to put in the effort to overcome the false perception you are running under; you and your environment will stay the same.

During this time of disrupted routines and forced isolation boredom is a real possibility for many us. For those of us with bipolar disorder, this boredom can lead to deeper issues.

We are bored because we feel ourselves or our environment cannot change, and for the next while it probably won’t, Saul Bellow offered the solution in his quote – Tap into your unused capacities as they are shrieking for use. You can also enlarge your capacities. Examples of these are endless.

Henry David Thoreau gave the best quote on mans capacities. “But man’s capacities have never been measured; nor are we to judge of what he can do by any precedents, so little have been tried.”

This is my list of using my capacities and growing some new ones.

  1. I am writing more. I love to write and create worlds and stories. So, I am doing more of this.
  2. I am cooking more and heathier meals. We have to eat, and most restaurants seem to be closed.
  3. I am researching more topics for this blog.
  4. I am connecting with people on skype, zoom, text and phone.
  5. I signed up to Duolingo to learn Spanish and Italian.
  6. I am taking a free online course to improve this blog.
  7. I am practicing gratitude by consciously looking for things to be grateful for.
  8. I set a goal to read one book a week.
  9. I am reading more blogs written by others.
  10. I am learning things from YouTube.

I hope this list gives you some ideas you can try to stave off boredom or sparks your own ideas. Remember that if you are feeling bored you are not using your capacities to live a joyous life even in this unprecedented time.

I pray you stay safe and well

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

I have used this book as a guide to overcoming adversities of other kinds and have found it to be a great reference to return to.

Overcoming Adversities: Going Beyond Frustration, Resentment, Depression, Exhaustion and Boredom…

https://amzn.to/2yED0S8

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melvin G McInnis MD FRCPsych.

This is a topic that is very real for bipolar sufferers at this time and beyond my ability to write about. Please read this article.

LET’S TALK: OVERCOMING LONELINESS

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Overcoming Loneliness Is A Skill:

Learning the skill of overcoming loneliness with bipolar disorder is not easy but it not impossible either. Bipolar disorder symptoms enhance our feelings of loneliness but does not make those feelings a fact.

Realizing that overcoming loneliness is a skill, not another inherent gift that everyone got but I didn’t, really helped me. I hope that a little bit of knowledge helps you as well.

If overcoming loneliness is a skill, then it is something that is open for everyone to learn.  This means overcoming loneliness is a life skill we can add to our tool kit to help move us towards that “Ducky” life that we seek. The term “Adulting” perfectly describes learning the skills required to overcome loneliness. Overcoming Loneliness is a skill requiring maturity.

The Difference Between Loneliness and Boredom:

The feelings of loneliness and boredom are often confused but are actually two distinct feelings or states of mind. Combating boredom is a whole other subject to be covered at a later date. For this post let us define loneliness and boredom to get at the differences.

Loneliness defined: To feel lonely one does not have to alone. The feeling of loneliness is when one perceives that they lack social acceptance, or the quality or quantity of their social sphere is lacking. Loneliness is a perception or state of mind.

Boredom defined:  Being bored is expressing a lack of interest in one’s current activity or surroundings. Boredom can also be caused by the inability to concentrate on the activity or surroundings. Feeling bored can also result when leaving the chaos of mental illness or addiction. Boredom is more than a perception; boredom usually has a repairable cause.

The Main Blocks To Overcoming Loneliness:

Feeling lonely is caused by our perception of our social dynamic. The things that block us from overcoming loneliness are the things that stop us from changing our perception of the people, places, things or situations in our lives.

  1. Cognitive Distortions and mental blocks.
  2. Unstable moods.
  3. Anxiety.
  4. Trauma.
  5. Depression.
  6. Feeling misunderstood.

Some form of outside help is usually required to deal with these blocks to overcoming loneliness.

Tools To Overcome Loneliness:

  1. Understand that feeling of loneliness is just that, a feeling, It is not a fact. It is important to understand that this overwhelming feeling of loneliness that you have is generated by your perception of yourself and the people, places, things, and situations around you. A simple statement did more to help me overcome loneliness than anything else. “Attitudes are contagious, is yours worth catching?” I found that the more I worked to develop a positive attitude the less lonely I felt.
  2. Connect with a higher power. We are made up of body, mind, and spirit. Bipolar is more than just a mental disorder, it affects us physically and it is a spirit killer. Our spirit craves a connection with universal power. Developing our connection with that universal power greatly reduces loneliness.
  3. Reach out to others. Although the telephone seems to weigh a thousand pounds at times of extreme loneliness, it is one of the best things that we can do. You do not have to tell whoever you call or text that you are lonely. You can just talk to them about anything.
  4. Squash your negative thoughts.  Our negative thoughts are what hold us captive in loneliness. The only way to squash these thoughts is by taking positive action.
  5. Become willing to experience things and meet people. No one with bipolar is initially willing to try new experiences or meet people unless you are manic. If you are manic it is unlikely loneliness even enters your mind, Willingness can be worked up to by action,
  6. Don’t isolate. Like a hurt animal, our first instinct when we are down is to isolate. We have to overcome that instinct if we are ever to overcome loneliness. Our bipolar disorder does a number on our natural instincts. Making them the opposite of what they really should be.
  7. Build your self-esteem. Self-esteem building is an exercise, exactly like any physical exercise, Self-esteem is a part of the spirit that our bipolar disorder has killed. There are many resources that can help you build your self-esteem. I have included my favorites in the related products section,
  8. Join things, either online or in the real world. Most of us who suffer from bipolar disorder are not joiners. Bluntly, we have had too many bad experiences. My first positive joining experience was with an online bipolar group. I mostly hung back for the longest time and just read the posts, But even that gave me a sense of connection with people who shared a similar problem.
  9. Challenge the story you are telling yourself. As bipolar sufferers we not only have negative thoughts, but our whole life narrative is decidedly negative. Challenging that story you are telling and reframing it into something else allows you to change your view on life.
  10. Develop a sense of Wonderment. If you didn’t grasp the meaning of this statement, don’t feel bad I didn’t either in the beginning. The best way to develop this sense of wonderment is to start by being grateful. Gratitude for life is what leads to that sense of wonderment and awe.
  11. Create a vision and make a vision board. Creating a vision for your life is not setting goals. Creating a vision requires you to develop faith and believe that the unbelievable can happen in your life. My vision for my life is to create an unbreakable connection with my authentic self and help others to achieve that unbreakable connection. Along the way to have a “Ducky” Life. That is potentially unachievable but worth working towards every day.
  12. Think and speak positively. Everyone says this and they say it because it is true. Changing your thinking and speaking from negative to positive will change your life. Positive thinking does not mean negative things will not happen in your life. Or that you should think positively about negative things. That is pure bullshit. What positive thinking does is raise your awareness of options that were hidden before when negative things happen.
  13. Connect with your authentic self. I am writing a book on this subject so I will keep this short. This simply means that you begin recognizing and overcome the identity crisis that bipolar disorder created in your life.
  14. Disconnect from social media. This is not contradicting all the earlier statements about joining online groups or reaching out with your smartphone. It means to ignore and unfollow all the political and negative stuff. It means to disconnect from the competition for likes and follows. I have one rule for social media – Check your motives for being there.
  15. Learn that you can be yourself and people will still like you. This is something that I found difficult. Not everyone is going to like you, but surprisingly more people will like you if you are willing to be yourself. I spent years being the chameleon, all things to all people, trying to fit in. When I quit trying to fit in and just was myself, my social circle grew beyond my wildest dreams.

Loneliness is more of a perception or state of mind that creates a feeling than a feeling all on its own. To overcome loneliness, we must first change our perception of the people, places, things or situations in our lives. I hope these 15 things will give you some ideas on how to combat your own feelings of loneliness.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

The Self-Esteem Workbook: 2nd Edition

https://amzn.to/33szvcJ

Self-Esteem: A Proven Program of Cognitive Techniques for Assessing, Improving, and Maintaining Your Self-Esteem.

https://amzn.to/39YFBEn

 

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Carol Borelli Originally featured in BPHope.

Cognitive Distortions Part 2 (Possible Trigger Warning.)

If you are visiting the website, please click on the title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Please read my full disclosure and privacy policy here:

What is Cognitive Distortion?

“A cognitive distortion is an exaggerated or irrational thought pattern involved in the onset and perpetuation of psychopathological states, especially those more influenced by psychosocial factors, such as depression and anxiety.”  Wikipedia

The Wikipedia definition does not specifically list bipolar disorder as a psychopathological disorder, but it is clearly stated in this article, https://www.verywellmind.com/a-list-of-psychological-disorders-2794776

Cognitive distortion, in its many forms, plagued me when bipolar disorder ruled my life. Especially when I fueled my bipolar with alcohol and drugs, stress or anxiety.

Science has identified at least 50 different cognitive distortions. Some are minor mental blocks, while others can be quite scary.

When cognitive distortion takes over, your brain is lying to you. It is causing you to interpret situations in your life falsely.

It is through cognitive distortion that we form the deeply seated false beliefs we come to hold.

Under the influence of cognitive distortion, we become almost unreachable.

To remove cognitive distortions and the deep-seated beliefs that we form in our distorted thinking, therapy is required. I am not a therapist and this blog is not about how to heal from cognitive distortion. I can only define cognitive distortion and discuss the most common forms I experienced in my bipolar life.

The 10 Types of Cognitive Distortion That I Believed Most:

  1. Perfectionist Thinking: I put this distortion as number one because studies conducted after suicides are proving that this perfectionist thinking distortion is the cause in over 50% of the cases, with or without a co-occurring mental health issue. This is the “if I can’t do it perfectly, I won’t do it at all,” way of thinking. There is also another side to the perfectionist thinking distortion that is seldom equated with it. That is, “everyone is better than me” thinking. Both of these ways of thinking that keeps us stuck. The “if I can’t do it perfectly, I won’t do it at all,” distortion kept me from writing anything for over 20 years The “everyone is better than me” thinking could keep me from blogging. There are many better bloggers than I am. Instead, I did something novel, I attach their blogs to this one. So you get the best I can offer as well as access to the best blogs and bloggers. That they are better than me then becomes irrelevant.
  2. Personalization:  This distortion is exactly what it says, we take everything personally. I think this distortion should be called, “everything is my fault.” My personal example of this was a friend who asked me what meds I was taking. I told him and he convinced his doctor to prescribe them. A few days later he killed himself. I believed for years that his death was all my fault. If I hadn’t told him about that med this would not have happened. That is not true, but it was hard to convince me otherwise.
  3. Blaming: This is the exact opposite of personalization. Everything that is wrong in your life is someone else’s fault. “None of this would have happened if my wife hadn’t died.” “The business would not have gone under if I had a better partner.” I actually said and believed both of those statements.
  4. Arbitrary inference:  This distortion causes us to believe something without any evidence to support that belief. “I am going to get fired.” “Everyone hates me.” Those are my favorite examples from my own life.
  5. Selective Abstraction: This distortion is also called Catastrophic Thinking. This happens when we take one minor event and come to a catastrophic conclusion. My girlfriend was supposed to meet me at 5 pm. It is now 5:20 so she must no longer want this relationship. The fact that she was stuck in traffic never entered my mind.
  6. Mental Filtering:  This distortion only allows you to see only the negative and totally ignore anything positive. One of my personal favorite distortions. “My shoes aren’t shined, no one is going to listen to me.” It’s not perfect, so it is useless.”
  7. Overgeneralization: is when we come to a general conclusion based on one bad incident or event. For me, the loss of my first wife caused me to believe everyone in my life was going to abandon me was the biggest example of this distortion.
  8. Should And Must Statements: This distortion is self-explanatory and two-sided. As an expert in I should/they should and I must/they must, let me explain. There are the I should’s, should haves and should not or I must, I must not, we apply to ourselves and then there are the, they should, they should have and they should not, they must, or they must not, we apply to others. The “should, should not, must, must not” game unintentionally applies very strict rules to our lives and the lives of others. Rules that are unbendable and, in all seriousness, only break us. This game creates depression and anger and is the fuel for the constant irritability in our lives. Should’s and musts are words I removed from my vocabulary and my thoughts.
  9. Emotional Reasoning: This distortion leads us to believe our feelings are fact, but it is slightly more complicated than that. My jealousy made me believe my wife was sleeping with every guy she saw. Feeling equals fact. I was overwhelmed in a lot of situations and therefore I could never solve a problem. Emotional reasoning causes us to conclude falsely based on a feeling. It does not necessarily mean that we are saying our feelings are a fact. But that our feelings are fueling an irrational conclusion. This distortion makes it hard for us to learn to trust our gut instincts. If you always jumped to the wrong conclusion from a feeling it is very hard to believe that you can learn to come to the right conclusions from a feeling. I have learned with a lot of help you can begin to trust your gut instincts.
  10. Jumping to Conclusions: This distortion is divided into two parts – mind reading, you know exactly what a person is feeling or thinking based on nothing. Or fortune-telling you know exactly what the outcome of a future situation is going to be – and it will be horrible. Mind reading – “She just winked at me – she loves me.” “He just looked at his watch, this must be a horrible meeting.”  In both those instances, I was totally wrong of course. The lady did wink at me because I did something, she appreciated but she could not speak of it in that situation. She did not love me.  The guy didn’t even look at his watch, he scratched his elbow. He came up and told me it was a fantastic meeting.   Fortune Telling – “My bipolar will always rule my life.”  And now I have a life I wouldn’t trade for anything. “I am going to screw this up.” Not so much anymore and if I do, I laugh. We don’t know the future so why is it we think we do?

Early on in my journey towards mental wellness when my anxiety, stress and other bipolar symptoms would leave for a bit and then come back, I could feel the cognitive distortions, especially delusions, personalization, blaming and mental filtering, begin to gain control. That was one of the strangest feelings I ever had, it was like I was sliding out of reality.

Cognitive distortions can be banished from our lives. With the help of a good therapist and by learning and practicing the specific questions we need to ask ourselves to ward off the distortion we can free ourselves.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

https://amzn.to/3ab6q86

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Madelyn Heslet.

Cognitive Distortions (Possible Trigger Warning.)

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Please read my full disclaimer and privacy policy here:

What is Cognitive Distortion?

“A cognitive distortion is an exaggerated or irrational thought pattern involved in the onset and perpetuation of psychopathological states, especially those more influenced by psychosocial factors, such as depression and anxiety.”  Wikipedia

The Wikipedia definition does not specifically list bipolar disorder as a psychopathological disorder, but it is clearly stated in this article, https://www.verywellmind.com/a-list-of-psychological-disorders-2794776

Cognitive distortion, in its many forms, plagued me when bipolar disorder ruled my life. Especially when I fueled my bipolar with alcohol, drugs, stress or anxiety.

Science has identified at least 50 different cognitive distortions. Some are minor mental blocks, while others can be quite scary.

When cognitive distortion takes over, your brain is lying to you. It is causing you to interpret situations in your life falsely.

It is through cognitive distortion that we form the deeply seated false beliefs we come to hold.

Under the influence of cognitive distortion, we become almost unreachable.

To remove cognitive distortions and the deep-seated beliefs that we form in our distorted thinking, therapy is required. I am not a therapist and this blog is not about how to heal from cognitive distortion. I can only define cognitive distortion and discuss the most common forms I experienced in my bipolar life.

Bipolar Disorders Star Cognitive Distortion:

Delusions:  Delusions are defined as a firm or fixed belief not based on fact, or open to rational argument, or behavior that is out of character for the sufferer. Wikipedia.

Delusional thinking is a symptom of bipolar disorder and I have chosen to cover this distortion separately.

As a sufferer of bipolar 1 disorder delusions were a major part of my active illness. As such, I have a lot to say about them

The Types of Delusions:

  1. Jealous – believes that his or her spouse or sexual partner is unfaithful. What they do not add in most definitions of this delusion is, “without proof.” If you have proof, it is not a delusion. This was me, always jealous and it took a lot of therapy to convince me this was a delusion. To describe this delusion, it is where jealousy is more than an emotion and becomes an all-consuming thought. Today I know the difference. Yes, I get jealous when some guy is paying my girlfriend to much attention. That is a normal emotion, so my therapist says.  I do not automatically, and always, think my girlfriend is cheating on me.
  2. Persecutory – you believe that you (or someone close to you) are being mistreated, or that someone is spying on you or planning to harm you. This delusion only happened to me under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Mostly it was someone spying on me or trying to harm me. I have suffered from the milder form of this delusion, everyone is against me, not that long ago. Writing this, I can easily recall the feeling of terror this delusion, that both the mild version or the extreme version, generated.
  3. Grandiose – an over-inflated sense of worth, power, knowledge, identity or invincibility. At the extreme, a person might believe he or she has a great talent or has made an important discovery. Have you ever been manic? This is mania. Write a 300,000-word novel in a week thinking it is the greatest thing ever written. In the light of reality, you find it is mostly gibberish. I still have that pile of paper to remind me. Yes, I have had that delusion of grandiosity.
  4. Erotomanic – believing that another person, often someone important or famous, is in love with you.  The extreme is stalking and trying to contact the person may happen. I have never had this delusion directed at a famous person, but I have unfortunately had this delusion, Even thinking about it makes me sad. I don’t think I ever stalked or tried to contact the person, but I was obsessed.
  5. Mixed – when two or more of the types of delusions listed above are held at the same time. Grandiosity and jealousy were never far from each other in my bipolar world. The weirdest was when I held the Erotomanic delusion, Grandiosity, and Jealousy all at the same time. Picture this scenario, I am a great writer in love with a woman and believe she loves me. I believe she is cheating on me.  I had only seen the woman briefly on a bus, once. That was it.  A great plot for a romance novel, but in real life not so much. So yes, I have experienced mixed state delusions.
  6. Somatic – believing you have a physical defect or medical problem. This is a delusion that I have never held. Maybe because of my invincibility belief.

Delusional thinking can be banished from our lives. With the help of a good therapist and by learning and practicing the specific questions we need to ask ourselves to ward off the delusion we can free ourselves.

To Be Continued ………….

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by BP Magazine.

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