365daysofbipolar.com

Where We Learn To Connect With Our Authentic Selves.

Category: Welcome (page 1 of 4)

What Is Connecting With Your Authentic Self?

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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What is connecting with your authentic self?

We all have to find our own best way of living. None of us do this exactly alike. By connecting with your authentic self, the best life for you becomes intuitive. You no longer have to think about what is best for you.

By connecting with your authentic self, you will:

  1. Know yourself, your needs, your values.
  2. How to protect yourself
  3. How to love yourself.   

The Most Important Step to Connecting With Our Authentic Self – Lean-to Manage Your Bipolar Disorder.

Realize that bipolar disorder is not going to go away. Bipolar is the mental equivalent of diabetes. Once you have bipolar disorder the best you can do is learn to manage bipolar disorder to alleviate the symptoms. No one can eliminate all the symptoms of bipolar, but by learning to manage your bipolar disorder in a way that works for you the symptoms will no longer rule your life. The management of our bipolar disorder is job #1. It is the most important thing we can do. You can not find your best way of living if bipolar disorder and its symptoms are ruling your life.

Bipolar Causes A Crisis of Identity:

Bipolar disorder creates roadblocks to finding our best way of living. To connect with your authentic self, you have to remove the roadblocks that bipolar disorder has set in your path. That is why I have named bipolar disorder a great deceiver. Bipolar disorder causes us to believe things that simply are not true.

It is impossible to live your best life if you have no idea who you are, what you need, what you value or how to live the life you want.

What is a crisis of identity?

The dictionary definition of a crisis of identity is: “a period of uncertainty and confusion in which a person’s sense of identity becomes insecure, typically due to a change in their expected aims or role in society.”

Bipolar causes us to lose our role in society.

We can’t hold down a job or work in the field we were educated in. As such we cannot be identified with what we do.

We are not good at relationships, be it as friends, family members, parents, children, husbands, and wives. We cannot be defined as the best or even good in any of those categories.

Bipolar destroys our role in society.

Bipolar destroys our aims in Society:

When we were young, we all wanted to “be” something. Bipolar disorder stole our dreams and ambitions.

Bipolar disorder makes us believe three things that are entirely untrue:

  1.  we are no longer worth anything.
  2. That we can no longer connect with others.
  3. What we want is no longer available.

By making us believe these three things Bipolar Disorder aims us in completely the wrong direction. Causing us to become externally focused which kills our ambition.

How to connect with your authentic self:

To connect with our authentic selves, we must learn to manage our bipolar disorder and overcome the identity crisis bipolar disorder has caused in us. To do this we must focus on ourselves and develop the necessary tools, skills, and habits to accomplish this goal.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

Related Products:

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BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Hillary Jacobs Hendel

https://www.salon.com/2018/07/22/what-toxic-stress-does-to-a-childs-brain-and-how-to-heal-it

Happy New Year. Welcome to 2020

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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Happy New Year from 365daysofbipolar.com. My hope with this site is to help you have the best 2020 you can possibly have. I know as a fellow bipolar disorder sufferer that battling this illness is never easy. The goal for 365daysofbipolar.com for 2020 is to provide a resource that you can turn to that provides helpful information, suggestions and tools that will make your 2020 into the best year you have ever had.

My first suggestion is that you subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020.

The first thing that is different in 2020 is this, originally it was boldly stated that 365daysofbipolar.com is: “dedicated to living with and overcoming #bipolar disorder. Because life, even with #bipolar disorder, should be ducky.” That is still what this site is dedicated to, living with and overcoming #bipolar disorder, but we have narrowed the focus. The focus of this site is now: “learning to connect with our authentic selves.”

Why is this important? In my own life and in talking to hundreds of fellow bipolar sufferers over the past few years what I have learned is that bipolar disorder is a great deceiver. Bipolar masks our true identity creating an identity crisis of epic proportions. I am not a doctor and therefore cannot comment on medications only to say medication has a purpose and is necessary.  I am not a therapist and therefore cannot comment on the therapeutic side of this illness. Again, all I can say is that therapy is necessary for battling this illness. What I can comment on, and provide a guide for, is overcoming that identity crisis that bipolar disorder causes and help you connect with your authentic self. So that has become the focus of this site, providing information to help us connect with our authentic selves.

As we head into 2020 together, I want to share something I recently learned from YouTuber Sunny Lenarduzzi. This is Sunny’s formula for getting what you want in 2020.

  1. What You Really Want. If you are reading this blog, I would say what you really want is to learn to manage your bipolar disorder and connect with your authentic self so that you can have that “Ducky” life I talk about on this site.
  2. Plus, How Hard Are You Willing To Work To Get That “Ducky” Life? Managing bipolar disorder requires work. It requires learning new skills and putting in place new positive habits. As you practice these new skills and put into place these habits, there will not be so much work, but in the beginning, it is a lot of work. The harder you work the more results you will see. But remember, the work is entirely on yourself and it takes time. As I always say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”
  3. Minus, Any Distractions That Stand In The Way Of You Getting That “Ducky” Life You Seek. Roadblocks are another way of saying distractions. If other people, places, situations or other external things are standing in the way of you getting that “ducky” life you seek, well then, they have to go. It is that simple.

To reach our goal of a “ducky” life we must develop the self-discipline to take control of our lives, our emotions, and our minds. This three-part plan is how we will get there.

Please comment below on what you would like to see presented on this site in 2020.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our lives and minds.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Beth Kurland Ph.D. published in Psychology Today.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-well-being-toolkit/201906/how-not-get-sucked-electronic-time-warp

The Importance of a treatment Plan

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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Bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it. We must find what works for each of us individually to be successful in managing our bipolar disorder. To find success in the treatment of bipolar disorder many sufferers often have created their own personalized treatment plan that works for them. Any treatment plan be if for medication, therapy, or lifestyle needs to be designed specifically for you with the aid of professionals.

All treatment plans contain certain elements:

  • The patient’s personal information, psychological history and demographics
  • A diagnosis of the current mental health problem
  • High-priority treatment goals
  • Measurable objectives
  • A timeline for treatment progress
  • Space for tracking progress

The important aspect of a treatment plan is your participation in the creation of the plan. Remember these are your objectives and goals for your illness. The professional helping you create this plan does not need these objectives and goals. Another aspect of treatment plans is who controls the plan. Yes, it is your plan but my suggestion is leave them in the care of the professionals as they have filing systems.

It is important to understand that your treatment plan is not carved in stone and will change as you discover new ways of managing your bipolar disorder and you progress towards mental wellness. In other words, as you progress your needs will change, and your plan must adapt to those needs.

My treatment plan has progressed from a plan based on medication and therapy in the beginning to one that is mostly about finding my optimum lifestyle choices. I had to progress through learning about my triggers, emotional intelligence, my boundaries, my needs and my values in my second plan which was strictly a therapy plan.  My focus today is on learning nutrition, exercise and advanced management techniques in self-care and meditation which involves a nutritionist and a therapist as the professionals.

I attribute a lot of my success in learning to manage my bipolar disorder by having professional support that insisted on developing a treatment plan with stated objectives and reachable goals right from the start.

Although bipolar is as individual as its sufferers having a treatment plan is for everyone who suffers from this illness.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by A Guest Author on Healthy Place.

https://www.healthyplace.com/blogs/yourmentalhealth/2019/12/we-can-all-emotionally-heal

Why Changing Perceptions is important

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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“There is no test for depression or bipolar disorder, as there is for cholesterol or blood sugar levels. In most cases, success is determined by patients’ perceptions and behavior. If they say they feel better, and act like it, then they are. No psychiatrist bats 1.000, and there is no X-ray to prove a mental break has been healed.” Quote from an article by Neely Tucker a Washington Post Reporter.

I have never found truer words to describe what I have tried to get across to the readers of this blog. You can successfully deal with bipolar disorder and heal the mental break if you find what works for you as an individual. Finding what works for you makes you feel better then you begin to act like you feel better and your whole world changes. This takes effort and to make the effort worthwhile you must retain the hope that you can feel better.

Are medications required? The purpose of medication in treating bipolar disorder is to stabilize the mind and moods. Medication alone will not fix you; medication just gives you a stable platform on which to fix your self. There are a lot of medications (57 at last count) used to treat bipolar and new ones are appearing regularly. Finding the one, or combination of ones, that work for you can be both frustrating and challenging. In my case, it took a couple of years and the trialing of over fifty medications or combinations of medications to find the mix that worked for me.

Is therapy required? Defiantly, therapy and a therapist are needed to challenge our thinking and help us overcome the trauma we have suffered. As well as to confront the false beliefs that our bipolar disorder has instilled in us. There are several types of therapy and several styles of therapists that are recommended for bipolar disorder.  Finding the therapist and type of therapy that works for you is also challenging. I had to kiss a few frogs before I found the prince that saved my life.

The only other requirement: Learn about and try the tools used in the management of bipolar disorder. Then adopt the ones that work for you. Adopt and develop good habits like eating and sleeping regularly plus regular exercise. Changing your diet, stop using drugs and alcohol and changing other harmful lifestyle habits are necessary for you to manage your bipolar disorder. The more you discover what works for you eliminate what doesn’t the more enjoyable this journey with bipolar disorder becomes.

As bipolar sufferers, we must do everything we can to change our perceptions and behaviors and adopt new habits that make us feel better so we can be better.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/365daysofbipolarcom-1412484182389749. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Linda Sapadin Ph.D

https://psychcentral.com/blog/the-importance-of-practice-and-preparation

It is what we concentrate on

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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This blog may turn into a rant, if it does that is not my intent. …

The focus of my thinking is always towards mental wellness. I focus on wellness, on better outcomes and solutions in my day rather than what is wrong in my life. In many places, by many writers and by the universal law of polarity we are told concentrating on the illness creates more illness. Concentrating on the opposite, in this case, mental wellness creates more wellness. I have taken this lesson and seared it into my mind.

Bipolar is a mental illness that can be overcome, not an excuse. We can choose to work towards mental wellness, or we can use our illness as an excuse to stay the way we are. Those are our real choices, but those choices can only happen once we know what our problem is. When in the throes of our illness we may suspect there is something wrong, but we are powerless to really do anything. Having been misdiagnosed for over 40 years and trying to fix what was wrong with me by solving the symptoms of ADHD, I can attest to that. It is only when we get in a situation that causes us to be given a proper diagnosis do our choices appear. It is what we do after our diagnosis that is important. I have started looking at this issue of pre and post-diagnosis quite differently. I used to beat myself up severely for all the insane things I did in my illness.  When I was in my illness, I was sick. I can no more blame myself for that as I can blame myself throwing up on the floor when I wake up with severe nausea. It is what happened and was unavoidable.

I quit beating myself up, period. I came to understand that all the things that I condemned myself for were either the result of my illness or the result of trying to learn this new way of living on the path to mental health, I knew nothing of this way of life and I made a lot of mistakes learning this new way of living. Mistakes are just learning experiences, not God condemned sins.  I have learned a lot about myself and the underlying causes of my inappropriate reactions to others. There are other issues in my life besides my bipolar disorder, or maybe because of bipolar disorder that were the result of trying to kill the pain and deal with the trauma in my life. These other issues that my illness caused before I learned there was a real cause for the pain and trauma must also be dealt with as well.

Our shared illness is not an excuse to remain as we are. It is something that is to be dealt with and overcome by learning who we are and connecting with our authentic selves. Bipolar disorder makes us self-centered, but we can actually get over that if we do what is recommended after our diagnosis such as take our meds and use counseling. Once we have a diagnosis, we have choices and it is the choices we make that place us on the path to mental wellness or leave us stuck in our illness. It is always our choice.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say, ” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/365daysofbipolarcom-1412484182389749. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Laura Fisher

The Most Frustrating Conversation

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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This week’s post speaks to a common problem that we as bipolar sufferers face. I have covered this problem from the aspect of when our professional support falls into their routine of this should work for that symptom failing to see us as who we are in this post and in the blog of the week I have attached a wonderful post by Natasha Tracy on toxic positivity another side of the same coin.

Here is the scenario: you go to your psychiatrist or your therapist because your bipolar management plan is not working and they say to you, “Take this or do that and it will work for you.”

You reply, “I have taken that or done that in the past and it did not work.”

Then you get that blank stare from your psychiatrist or your therapist.

That is when you know that your psychiatrist or your therapist is not seeing you.

You may be in their presence, but they are not connecting with you. They are just going by their routine saying this symptom or behavior requires this med or this action.

Psychiatrists and therapists are people just like us and they fall into routines just like the rest of us. That is when it gets frustrating. Because it then becomes our job to make them see us. To see us not as just another patient but as a real person.

Now it is wrong to expect that every time we walk in the door of our professional support they are going to be as attentive as they were when we were a new patient. That is an unreasonable expectation. It is reasonable to expect that when we come into their office, they should know who we are.

Let us replay that conversation again:

You go to your psychiatrist or your therapist because your bipolar management plan is not working and they say to you, “Take this or do that and it will work for you.”

You reply, “I have taken that or done that in the past and it did not work.” Then you get that blank stare from your psychiatrist or your therapist.

Our normal bipolar response to this situation is to complete the appointment and never go back because we think that the psychiatrist or therapist does not care about us. These are the lies our bipolar mind tells us to destroy helpful relationships.

Since these are actual conversations from my life that have happened with both my psychiatrist and my therapist, I can share how I learned to respond when it became my job to make them see me.

My angry response is, “I have told you over and over to never say, “this will work for you.” You are not me and you have no idea what will work for me.”

That usually wakes them up. Being bipolar and the fact that I am there because my management plan is not working, I am usually angry.  But I do have a calm response as well.

“Look, we have tried a lot of stuff, so you are not going to remember everything we tried. How about we try something new.”

Sometimes it is our job to make others see us as an individual, not just part of the crowd.  It is difficult but we can learn the skills to make it happen.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our minds

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like and follow us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/365daysofbipolarcom-1412484182389749. Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Natasha Tracy

Ten Things to Think about

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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Although bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it, there are many common traits. This week is I propose ten things to think about on how we treat our best friends better than we treat ourselves.

  1. We can always trust our BFF. Yet, we never trust ourselves.
  2. We would always be accepting of our BFF. Yet, we always have trouble accepting ourselves.
  3. We would never lie to our BFF. Yet, we always lie to ourselves.
  4. We would never judge our BFF. Yet, we are always our biggest critic.
  5. We would always listen to our BFF. Yet, we seldom listen to ourselves
  6. We would always forgive our BFF. Yet, we can’t forgive ourselves.
  7. We would always make our BFF feel wanted and included. Yet, we isolate ourselves.
  8. We would always celebrate the successes of our BFF. Yet, we instantly downplay anything good we ever do.
  9. We don’t have to try to do things with our BFF. Yet, doing anything in our own life is a chore.
  10.  We are always kind to our BFF. Yet we are seldom kind to ourselves.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday.

Like and follow us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com.

Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Margarita Tartakovsky M.S.

https://psychcentral.com/blog/are-you-making-these-4-communication-mistakes-in-your-romantic-relationship/

It’s About Progress

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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If someone tells you that dealing with BP is not a struggle every day, they are lying. Over the last couple of days, I have been thinking a lot about my personal progress, the ups and downs, and the one step forward three steps back approach that was the beginning of my journey. That has now progressed to a steady, or unsteady, trudge onward. I am now able to see a lot of beauty around me instead of the blackness that overshadowed everything.

One of the most telling parts of this look over my shoulder at the path behind me is the distinct change in perception and attitude that has come about on the journey towards mental wellness.  At one time concentrating on and learning all about the illness that I suffered from was paramount to me and my way of thinking. However, all though the knowledge has been helpful in getting to know myself and how my illness affects me, this approach seemed to leave me mired in the illness. Only by shifting my perception to mental wellness was I able to shake this stuck in the “Land of Oz” feeling.

By concentrating on the illness, the illness would control me even though I wanted to be better. When my focus became wellness, I was able to begin to overcome my mental anguish and emotional turmoil. It was only when I concentrated on mental wellness was I able to become useful and productive. Only by concentrating on wellness was I able to become a functioning person in society.

If I concentrated on the illness I could not overcome, but that shift of perception to mental wellness took time and I now understand it was part of the growth process. We all must start with our illness and learning to cope with that illness and then we can progress towards mental wellness. Mental Wellness then becomes our focus, to be mentally well becomes our mantra, a condition and way of thinking I would not trade for anything.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by The Blurt Team

Please Follow Them

https://www.blurtitout.org

@https://www.blurtitout.org/2018/11/22/depression-cope-upheaval-lives/

I Suffer From Imposter Syndrome

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experience in the hope it may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). Please note that I only recommend books and products that I personally use and love and I always have my readers’ best interest at heart. At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

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Having written this blog for five years with organizations wanting to pay to be part of this site, published a children’s story, with a second in the process of being published and asked to write a book about my take on bipolar disorder, which are all good solid accomplishments. Yet, there was always this nagging doubt in the back of my mind. This doubt that I was not worthy or just a plain fraud. This doubt has been holding me back. Keeping me from fully enjoying these accomplishments and striving for more, no matter what I do. But today I have a name for what is holding me back. It is called imposter syndrome. For me that is important, putting a name to the problem. Marc Brackett of the Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence said it best, “Labeling your emotions is key. If you can name it, you can tame it.”

That is what I am now able to do, work on taming this feeling that I am an imposter.

What on earth is imposter syndrome, you may ask? “The imposter syndrome is a psychological term referring to a pattern of behavior where people doubt their accomplishments and have a persistent, often internalized fear of being exposed as a fraud. Not an actual disorder, the term was coined by clinical psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in 1978, when they found that despite having adequate external evidence of accomplishments, people with imposter syndrome remained convinced that they don’t deserve the success they have.” Psychology Today.

That sums up how I feel. Now that the problem has a name, I can find a solution. Having overcome other things that hitched a ride on my bipolar disorder, like addiction and severe codependency. The clinical term is comorbid disorders, but I really dislike that word. “Hitched a ride on my bipolar” paints a better picture in my mind. A picture that shows, yes these are separate things, but they stuck to me because of my untreated bipolar disorder.  

Today, I know that there is a way to root out these deeply internalized feelings that are blocking my connection with my authentic self. I will keep you posted on how dealing with Imposter Syndrome in my life progresses and what tools I use to rid myself of these thought patterns.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by
Susan Biali Haas, M.D.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/ca/blog/prescriptions-life/201903/make-good-habit-stick-notice-how-good-it-feels

Finding a different starting point

I always begin writing each post with the same premise in mind, “bipolar is as individual as the people that suffer from it”.

I had to find a different starting point for many things in my life. I had to find a different starting point in the area of meditation than what was being offered me, as none of those ways worked. I had to find different definitions for ambition and success before I could really move forward.

When I read the quote, “Discover who you truly are and fully give every aspect of your uniqueness to the world. This is your path to an extraordinary life.” James McWhinney.

That is what I really wanted, “an extraordinary life” but I only saw one part of what the author was saying, that is “give every aspect of your uniqueness to the world.”. I latched on to that part of the quote and missed the rest. Because I did show “every aspect of my uniqueness to world” on a lot of occasions and all it ever got me was rejected or locked up. So that approach has a real stigma attached to it and “showing my uniqueness” was not my path to an extraordinary life.

What I am writing about is how we, as bipolar sufferers, must look at things that are said and written and then set out for the “so called normal” world. We must recognize that we see and interpret things differently. Even when we are on the path to mental wellness, we must be careful that we are hearing and reading what is said and written and not go by the reaction in our head. When I read things like the above quote I need to slow down and read the whole quote a few times. Then relate that quote to what I know.

For me the path to extraordinary life did lay in discovering who I truly was. I called it “growing my inner child”, but “giving every aspect of my uniqueness to the world” was not part of that path

I am not about show my uniqueness to the world ever again, because my uniqueness to me means me in my illness.  I have worked diligently at discovering who I am so that I can present that person to the world, the sane reasonable person. I find I am not that unique when I am close to mental wellness. I can find sameness or shared ideals with others that do not make me feel isolated, unique and different. Those feelings and actions of isolation and uniqueness are a part of my illness. Always thinking I was different was fuel for my illness.

If I want to carve a path to an extraordinary life, my uniqueness and the stigma attached to that word is not the direction that I need to go in, I need to find a different starting point. On this issue of finding an extraordinary life, I find looking for the sameness with others, especially those I respect, to be the starting point for me.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Remember our battle for mental health will always be with our minds and our minds alone.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Please subscribe to this blog or check back every Wednesday. Like us on Facebook at 365daysofbipolar.com. Follow us on Twitter @365daysofbipol2

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melanie McKinnon as appeared in BPHope blog.

Due to a technical error this blog is unavailable.

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