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Tag: bipolar disorder (page 1 of 6)

THE MORE OF BIPOLAR MANAGEMENT

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

There Is More To Bipolar Management.

“Sometimes the smallest step in the right direction ends up being the biggest step of your life. Tip Toe if you must, but take a step.” – Naeem Callaway

Bipolar disorder is as individual as the people that suffer from it. That individuality is the reason that bipolar disorder management must be tailored to the individual. There are generalities that apply to most of us, but there are cases where none of the generalities apply.

I end every post with the same statements because they are true. The ones that apply to this post are,

“Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.”

“Work harder on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

“Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.”

Standard Bipolar Management Strategies.

When you check out the standard bipolar management strategies, they usually say:

  1. eat healthy,
  2. sleep properly
  3.  exercise.

Everyone is supposed to do that! That advice is not specific to bipolar management. Not only that, but you can eat as healthy as you can, sleep eight or nine hours a night, and exercise like a fiend, but none of those actions will fix your mental state.

Manage Bipolar Disorder With Medication.

There are now 50 or more medications recommended for the treatment of the bipolar disorder. Research is proving that there are many nutraceuticals (supplements) that are also beneficial in bipolar management.

Bipolar disorder is as individual as the people that suffer from it. This means it takes a commitment from both the bipolar sufferer and the medical professional to find the pharmaceutical or the combination of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals, that actually work for the individual.

Medications, be it pharmaceuticals or nutraceuticals, do not fix your mental state. Medications stabilize your mind giving you a stable platform with which to work on the real problem.

Manage Bipolar Disorder With Therapy.

There is a misconception when it comes to therapy and that is that the therapist is going to fix you. Nothing could be further from the truth. A good therapist is nothing more that a guide and sounding board. The therapist’s job is to challenge our thinking and help us confront our false beliefs.

Bipolar disorder fills our minds with misconceptions and false beliefs that are firmly embedded and only with help can we overcome these. These misconceptions and false beliefs act like walls that stop us from connecting with our authentic selves.

Managing Bipolar Disorder With Mood Tracking.

“There is an app for that.” There is no truer statement for the area of mood tracking. At my last count there are some 30 apps solely devoted to mood tracking and many more that combine mood tracking with journaling.

Mood tracking is more than just noting your highs and lows. Mood tracking allows you to see how outside influences affect your mood. Diligent mood tracking will quickly highlight the things that trigger your emotions.

The More Of Bipolar Management.

By incorporating all of the above, taking your medication, eating well, exercising, practicing good sleep hygiene, tracking your moods, and working with your therapist, you have a decent bipolar management strategy. This strategy may even give you a decent life. But if you want that “Ducky” life there is more and that more is learning.

Learning how bipolar disorder affects you as an individual.

Learning what works for you to manage your bipolar symptoms.

Learning who the person is that bipolar disorder hid away.

Learning skills like proper boundaries.

Learning to improve both your mental and emotional resilience.

The path to mental wellness is hard, it involves a good basic routine and lots of learning. It involves consistency and looking solely at yourself. Remember, “Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.”

Adding learning to your bipolar management is worth it, because if you do those things your life will change like magic.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Dana Arcuri

http://www.danaarcuri.com/blog/what-is-stealing-your-peace-of-mind

Why We Should Stop Using The Term “High Functioning” In The Mental Health Community.

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

Why We Should Stop Using The Term “High Functioning” In The Mental Health Community.

I have never felt the need to start a campaign, but I do on this issue. In the mental health community, the term “High Functioning” is being used to describe a set of people with a mental illness who have better-coping skills in some situations than others who suffer from the same illness. My campaign is to remove the term “High Functioning” from the language of the mental health community.

In my own case someone could apply the term “High Functioning” to me today, but until 10 years ago it would not have applied to my life at all as I could not function at all. Does that mean I no longer have bipolar 1 disorder? No, it means I have worked my ass off learning to manage my illness. Everyone who has learned to manage their mental illness should get a medal not a label that sets them apart.

What caused me to start this campaign?

In a medical file, a mental health professional wrote – he suffers from “high functioning” depression. Where they should have written – he suffers from dysthymia.

The use of the term, “High Functioning” has caused an individual no end of grief. The inability to qualify for any medical benefits or health insurance payments being the most devastating as these entities equate “High Functioning” as not having depression at all.

And of course, the mental health professional who wrote that statement bears no responsibility, stating: “It is a commonly used term within the mental health community.”

Why should this concern anyone?

The term “High Functioning” is not in any manual or diagnostic tool related to mental illnesses. Using a term that has no basis in any manual or diagnostic tool means other agencies can define the term as they see fit.

Origins Of The Term “High Functioning.”  

My research is showing the term “High Functioning” originally comes from either the area of mental disability or autism. I cannot be sure of which area the term escaped into the mental health community.

 I have experience in the field of the mentally and physically disabled. That is where my education is, and I worked in that field. A mental disability affects the persons intellectual capacity. The term “Higher Functioning” was used to describe the level of care a client required.

In one of the places I worked, we had two 30-year-old clients, one with an intellectual capacity of a teenager, the other client that had the intellectual capacity of a two-year-old  The client with the capacity of a teenager was “Higher Functioning” than the other client and needed less care as they could do certain tasks themselves, like dress themselves and eat unaided.

In the situation of mental disability, the term ‘higher functioning’ fits because it relates to level of care.

 I have no experience with Autism other than the understanding autism is a developmental condition. The term “High Functioning” seems to differentiate the level of social skills a person with autism displays.

This was the first use of the exact term “High Functioning” instead of the term “Higher Functioning” that is used in the field of mental disability.

How did the term “High functioning” invade the mental health community?

The term “High Functioning” seems o be applied by mental health professionals to an individual. The reasons seem to vary but the most common is to “take the sting out of a diagnosis” or “because it sounds better ( I got this statement from the professional who wrote the term “High Functioning” in my friend’s file).

The fact that the mental health professionals are perpetuating this term is perplexing as its professionals that should know better than to transfer terminology between fields with different parameters

As individuals we then perpetuate the term “High Functioning” by applying the term to ourselves without thinking how that term sets us apart.

Terminology effectively used in one field is terminology improperly used in another if the basic parameters of the fields are not the same. The fields of mental disability and autism may be similar enough to allow the term “High Functioning” to apply to both. But there are no similarities between those fields and the field of mental illness.

The Danger of Using The Term “High Functioning” In Regard To Mental Illness.

  1. The term “High Functioning” has no meaning in the realm of mental illness. The term “High Functioning” has no place in the conversations about mental health or because it may “sound better” than an actual diagnosis.
  2. is not a diagnosis, but a judgment on a person. In the fields of mental disability, this judgment is on the level of care required for them by the caregivers, not how they live their lives. In the mental health community, it is a judgment on how we live our lives.
  3. Using The term “High Functioning” and writing it in a file may cause a person to not qualify for disability benefits or disability insurance when the person needs it because they are no longer “High Functioning”.
  4. The term “High Functioning” negates the fact that someone has “learned” the skills to cope in some situations. Because they are labeled “High Functioning” leads people to believe they no longer have a mental illness. In reality, all they have done is learn to cope a little better some of the time and still suffer from the illness in all areas.
  5. divides us within the mental health community. Because a person is said to be “High Functioning” this leads others with the shared illness to think that the “High Functioning” person is not as affected by the illness the same as they are.
  6. “High Functioning” adds to the stigma put on everyone who suffers from a mental illness. Because one is able to cope a little better and gets the label “High Functioning” the outside world, which has no concept of the labels meaning, has another excuse to use against those who are not functioning as well with the same mental illness.

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If we do not allow ourselves to be labeled as “High Functioning” or label ourselves in that way, it would not take long for that term to disappear from the language of mental health conversations.

The term “High Functioning” has no place in the conversations about mental health as the term has no meaning in the field of mental illness.

It is true that all fields have their jargon and agreed-upon terminology, but in most cases, they also have the backbone to explain the jargon and terminology to outside agencies. The mental health community seems to be sorely lacking in this capacity. 

In 2017, I wrote a post entitled “Is Bipolar Like A Cold” outlining how the symptoms of a cold do not affect me a deeply as my girl friend. No medical professional would dare say I had a “High Functioning” cold even though I am not affected by the symptoms as deeply as my girlfriend. A cold is a cold as a mental illness is a mental illness. There are no varying degrees in the diagnosis. The only variation is in the way the symptoms affect the individual.

It is unfortunate “High Functioning” was allowed to pervade the mental health industry as it is divisive, hurtful to all who have mental illness and adds to the stigma that already follows those of us with a mental illness. Let us use stop using the term “High Functioning” and start using defined diagnosis only in speech and writing.

Please share post with as many people as possible so we may kill the term “High Functioning” and remove it from our community.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Alexa Ceza

https://www.alexaceza.com/post/5-things-you-should-stop-doing-to-yourself-mental-health

May Is Mental Health Awareness Month

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

May is Mental Health Awareness Month.

A Bit Of History.

May was established as Mental Health Awareness Month in 1949 by the Mental Health America organization. Mental Health Awareness month reaches millions of people through the media, local events, and other promotions.

Mental Health Awareness Has A Purpose.

The purpose is to raise awareness and educate the public about mental illness.

To draw attention to what its like to live with depression, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder.

To help provide strategies for mental health and wellness.

To draw attention to the potential for suicide that prevalent with these mental illnesses.

To help reduce the stigma given to those that suffer from mental illness.

Every year Mental Health Awareness Month has a theme and since 2018 the theme has been #4mind4Body.

Each there is a tool kit.

https://www.mhanational.org/2020toolkit

Mental Health Awareness Month 2020

The four months leading up to May 2020 have shed a light on the fragility of the world’s mental health when everyone’s world turned upside down. From the fear of Covid -19 infection to forced isolation, to unprecedented business closures and layoffs. If you are working unless you are a front line worker or an essential service, you are likely working from home. Our world seems out of control or at least out of our personal control.

This is unheard of in anyone’s lifetime and it is taking a toll on everyone’s mental health.

Finding Positivity in the Crisis.

One of the most positive things that I have seen is the outreach on social media and the prevalence of zoom and other connection apps. This has brought about a new way to connect with our support, be it professional and non-professional.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by John Poehler

VITAMIN C MORE THAN AN IMMUNE BOOSTER FOR THOSE WITH BIPOLAR

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

Vitamin C is more than an immune booster.

To avoid Covid – 19 we are encouraged to boost our immune systems. The simplest immune booster is vitamin C. For those of us with bipolar Vitamin C has other surprising benefits. Studies are showing that Vitamin C has many benefits in brain function and in mood stabilization.

Studies indicate that Vitamin C does the following:

  1. Improves cognitive function.
  2. Reduces anxiety
  3. Reduces Mania
  4. Strengthens Neurons and Neuron connectors
  5. Reduces depression
  6. It helps protect against toxins.
  7. It helps the body reduce its load of vanadium, a mineral that adversely influences bipolar disorder. 

Other information studies have indicated.

In a Brazilian study, it was found that Vitamin C may be as effective as Fluoxetine (Prozac) in combating depression.

In New Zealand studies it was proven that most people in the western world are Vitamin C deficient (North Americans especially so).

Sources of Vitamin C:

  • Citrus fruits like oranges, grapefruits, and tangerines
  • Cantaloupe
  • Kiwis
  • Papayas
  • Guavas
  • Strawberries
  • Dark leafy greens (kale, mustard greens, spinach, beet greens, turnip greens, Swiss chard, rainbow chard, collard greens, watercress, dandelion greens, purslane)
  • Broccoli, cauliflower, brussels sprouts
  • Red cabbage

With the new information on the link between inflammation and bipolar disorder these foods of the nightshade family are proven to be inflammatory but are good sources of Vitamin C for people who are not concerned with inflammation.

  • Bell peppers (yellow bell peppers provide the most vitamin C and green bell peppers provide the least)
  • Tomatoes and tomato juice
  • Red and green hot chili pepper

Vitamin C is destroyed by heat and air. Food should be eaten raw or cooked lightly and consumed quickly after cutting or juicing.

Recommended Dosages of Vitamin C.

Humans cannot make Vitamin C; we need to get these dosages from our diet. Smokers need higher dosages of Vitamin C.

Males & Females: 1-3 years 15 mg

Males & Females: 4-8 years 25 mg

Males & Females: 9-13 years 45 mg

Males: 14-18 years 75 mg

Females: 14-18 years 65 mg

Males:19+ years 90 mg

Females: 19+ years 75 mg

For bipolar disorder sufferers, a minimum dosage of 1000 mg daily is recommended and should not exceed 2,000 mg daily. Studies have shown that taking over 2,000 mg daily can cause nausea and diarrhea. These high dosages are unlikely to be obtained through food alone and Vitamin C supplements may be required.

As with any change to your bipolar management strategy you should discuss adding vitamin C in consultation with your professional support team.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

Naka Platinum PRO Pure Vitamin C 1000 mg Delayed Release 100% Vegetarian – BONUS Size 180 Veggie Capsules (150+30)

https://www.amazon.ca/gp/search/ref=as_li_qf_sp_sr_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=365daysofbipo-20&keywords=Naka Platinum PRO Pure Vitamin C 1000 mg Delayed Release 100% Vegetarian – BONUS Size 180 Veggie Capsules (150+30)&index=aps&camp=15121&creative=330641&linkCode=ur2&linkId=366f0a806d80c93c69ab2b727924524f

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Single Mom Chapters

MAYBE HERO’S AND MENTORS ARE WHAT WE NEED IN THIS UNCERTAIN TIME

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

In this time of uncertainty hero’s and mentors maybe what we need for our mental health. They are out there and it is our job to find them.

What is a hero and how to find one?

A hero is that torch that you can follow. The spark that ignites the fire that says if they can, I can too. The biographies of the great men and women are waiting on the shelves of libraries, bookstores, and online in Wikipedia for you to find the hero that speaks to you in a way you can understand and want to follow.

My current hero is Colonel Sanders, the founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken. Why would I choose him as a hero? Because when most people are winding down their working lives he was just getting started. In my case after battling this illness unsuccessfully for decades my life is just getting started in my 60’s as well. If he had quit when he turned 65 and settled for his little pension, we would never have known who he was. He did not settle, and I do not want to settle either. He had something to offer the world, a secret recipe of herbs and spices, and I would like to think I have something to offer in my writing of children’s stories and this blog.

There was one other thing about Col. Sanders that his biography shed a light on. He had failed a lot in his life. His biographer John Ed Pearce wrote, “[Sanders] had encountered repeated failure largely through bullheadedness, a lack of self-control, impatience, and a self-righteous lack of diplomacy.”

I could really relate to that line as it pretty much summed up my bipolar life except the fear.

What is a mentor and how to find one?

A mentor is someone who has trod the path that you are on and can keep you from some of the errors that they have suffered through. The best mentors have no ulterior motives and only sincerely want the best for you. It is a relationship like none other in this day and age. A good mentor is not a bank, a taxi, or your savior. They are just a person who will never turn you away no matter what you have done.

My current mentor and I have welded a relationship over the last number of years and even in the depths of my last episode in 2010 never once turned me away. I just refused to listen to wise words because I was so wrapped up in my illness that nothing penetrated. We can laugh about that today.

How do you find a mentor? First, you must put yourself in a position to meet one. Attending support groups is usually a good place to start. Although many who attend support groups fall away as they reach a feeling of wellness, some stay to give back to the people who are still suffering. Those are the potential mentors. With the advent of online forums and chats finding someone you can forge a long distant relationship with has also become an option. I have a few people that I mentor through email. There is only one requirement to having a mentor and that is honesty. If you cannot be honest don’t bother. For the few that I mentor face to face the first thing I say is “I don’t care if you lie to me, just don’t lie to yourself.”

There are many tools to be found on the path to mental wellness. Two of the best are finding a hero and a mentor. They are the fire and the forge that can weld you into a person of integrity and keep you on the path to mental wellness.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations, or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am extremely interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Madelyn Chung

https://www.madelynchung.com/blog/2019/4/26/i-showered-today-1

LET US TALK – SELF-CARE

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

During this time of uncertainty, we have a great opportunity. An opportunity to work on ourselves. To learn good stewardship of our minds, bodies, and spirits.

My basic premise, that bipolar is as individual as the people who suffer from it, is also true of Self-Care. The first thing I have to admit is I changed the word self-care to stewardship for my life. I am the steward of my life. My life’s one and only caretaker.
Why did I change the word I use to define caring for myself? A mentor made the greatest observation when discussing the topic of self-care. “Pretend you are a beautiful flower, say an orchid. Do you know how to take care of a beautiful flower, like an orchid?”

Of course, I had no idea how to take care of a flower or any other plant at that time. That was his point. Self-care is not something we inherently know how to do. We have to learn what works for us.

For me, taking the approach that I was outside myself and tending to me like I was a plant I knew nothing about really helped me in the beginning.

To be a good steward of the orchid I want my life to become I needed to develop some skills and knowledge.

  1. To learn what the orchid likes, wants and needs.
  2. To know what can attack the orchid or reduce its life.
  3. To not only love the plant but love caring for the plant.

This interprets into knowing, protecting and loving ourselves and loving the act of caring for ourselves when we apply this to our persons. The thing is we have no idea about these things, and we have to learn them.

One other issue that caused me to change my terminology from self-care to stewardship is that this has allowed me to shut out all the noise that has become the self-care industry. Don’t get me wrong there is fantastic information out there under this topic but lighting candles and taking bubble baths did nothing for me. A lot of what is sold as self-care is just being momentarily good to ourselves and has no long-term effect on us. Self-care is a topic is sliding towards instant gratification rather than long term results. If you are the steward of something it instantly connotates you are in this for the long haul.

This is a difficult time for all of us. To help us get through this we need to be good to ourselves and love each other. If this post and this blog can help you learn to be good stewards of your mind, body, and spirit I am overjoyed.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

Self-Care for the Real World: Practical self-care advice for everyday life.

https://amzn.to/2xzvGqG

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Lachlan Brown.

https://hackspirit.com/self-love

OVERCOMING BOREDOM

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the posts title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences and the knowledge that I have gained in the hope those experiences and knowledge may help you.

Being Bored Is Different Than Feeling Lonely:

The feelings of loneliness and boredom are often confused but are actually two totally different emotions or feelings.

Loneliness defined: To feel lonely one does not have to alone. The feeling of loneliness is when one perceives that they lack social acceptance, or the quality or quantity of their social sphere is lacking. Loneliness is a perception or state of mind.

Boredom defined:  Being bored is expressing a lack of interest in one’s current activity or surroundings. Boredom can also be caused by the inability to concentrate on the activity or surroundings.

The False Beliefs That Causes Boredom:

Boredom, like loneliness, is based on perception There is a perception problem when the feeling of boredom enters our lives Mainly our boredom is founded in one of two false perceptions.

The first false perception is best described in this quote.

“Boredom is the conviction that you can’t change – the shriek of unused capacities.” Saul Bellow. We feel that something can’t change, or we are stuck in a hopeless situation.

How Do We Overcome Boredom?

We have defined boredom and learned what false perception causes this feeling of boredom. What do we need to do to actually overcome boredom? Well, that depends, but I have found one constant. To overcome boredom requires conscious effort. Without the willingness to put in the effort to overcome the false perception you are running under; you and your environment will stay the same.

During this time of disrupted routines and forced isolation boredom is a real possibility for many us. For those of us with bipolar disorder, this boredom can lead to deeper issues.

We are bored because we feel ourselves or our environment cannot change, and for the next while it probably won’t, Saul Bellow offered the solution in his quote – Tap into your unused capacities as they are shrieking for use. You can also enlarge your capacities. Examples of these are endless.

Henry David Thoreau gave the best quote on mans capacities. “But man’s capacities have never been measured; nor are we to judge of what he can do by any precedents, so little have been tried.”

This is my list of using my capacities and growing some new ones.

  1. I am writing more. I love to write and create worlds and stories. So, I am doing more of this.
  2. I am cooking more and heathier meals. We have to eat, and most restaurants seem to be closed.
  3. I am researching more topics for this blog.
  4. I am connecting with people on skype, zoom, text and phone.
  5. I signed up to Duolingo to learn Spanish and Italian.
  6. I am taking a free online course to improve this blog.
  7. I am practicing gratitude by consciously looking for things to be grateful for.
  8. I set a goal to read one book a week.
  9. I am reading more blogs written by others.
  10. I am learning things from YouTube.

I hope this list gives you some ideas you can try to stave off boredom or sparks your own ideas. Remember that if you are feeling bored you are not using your capacities to live a joyous life even in this unprecedented time.

I pray you stay safe and well

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

I have used this book as a guide to overcoming adversities of other kinds and have found it to be a great reference to return to.

Overcoming Adversities: Going Beyond Frustration, Resentment, Depression, Exhaustion and Boredom…

https://amzn.to/2yED0S8

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Melvin G McInnis MD FRCPsych.

This is a topic that is very real for bipolar sufferers at this time and beyond my ability to write about. Please read this article.

HAPPY BELATED WORLD BIPOLAR DAY

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

“At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of. They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.” Carrie Fisher

Happy World Bipolar Day, although slightly late. The theme of the day was “Strength for today and hope for tomorrow.”

Unfortunately, with the world as it is all the events that had been planned were canceled. But having events is not what this day is about for me. I look at this day as a historical landmark.

World Bipolar Day was established on March 30, 2014, on the birthday of one of the most famous bipolar sufferers, Vincent Van Gough. Although in Vincent’s time he would have been diagnosed with circular insanity. Which was how they were describing the cycle of mania and depression at that time. It wasn’t until 1921 that the term and diagnosis of manic depression was established. In 1980 the diagnosis of Bipolar Disorder was established and 34 years later a day was designated.

I firmly believe that in all of history, if you are to have bipolar disorder this is the best time to have this diagnosis. The stigma around this illness is diminishing. No, it is not completely gone, but compared to when I was properly diagnosed in 2009 the stigma is not nearly as damaging. The medication and other tools to battle this illness are improving almost daily. Support, both professional and non-professional, is more readily available. The amount of information available to the bipolar sufferer to help them cope with all aspects of this illness is amazing.

On World Bipolar Day 2020 we have lots to celebrate. I encourage you to celebrate the advances in treating this illness, not just on March 30th, but every day.

Although many people still struggle horribly with the illness, there is hope. There may never be a cure for bipolar disorder, but bipolar management is becoming easier and easier with each advance.  The path to managing your bipolar disorder is hard in the beginning as you learn the new skills and routines that proper management requires. Just remember hard does not mean impossible and no one is doing this perfectly. No one expects you to do this perfectly either. As Carrie Fisher said, “if you are doing it at all you deserve a medal.”

Be proud, not ashamed.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

The Bipolar Workbook, Second Edition: Tools for Controlling Your Mood Swings.

https://amzn.to/2R0E5tN

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by the team at Secret Law of Attraction.

A SHORT MESSAGE DURING THIS TROUBLING TIME.

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Please read my full disclosure and policy statement here:

I felt a need to talk to you directly about the current situation in the world.

I had a very different blog scheduled for this week, but really believe that I needed to add my voice to this subject.

Then I had problems with my computer. I spent hours trying to fix the issue over the phone. This was very trying. So, I am posting this late.

Many of us with bipolar disorder are experiencing increased anxiety at this time over the Covid-19 pandemic.  I have to admit I have had quite a lot of anxiety myself over this situation.

 Besides the anxiety, there are also things that are happening that make just managing our bipolar disorder had become more difficult.

One of the main difficulties that I have experienced is limited access to professional support. Access to medication has so far not been a problem for me, but I have heard it has been for others.

My routines have been destroyed. But I have installed new ones and that is mainly what I want to share. What I am doing and not doing to keep my mental health during this time of a global pandemic.

I am reaching out more by phone, text and Facebook plus Skype.

Now that my computer is fixed, I am writing.

I am writing a personal growth plan. I have attached a great article to the blog of the week section on how to do this.

I am not watching or reading the news.

I am watching Netflix.

I am learning things via YouTube.

I am reading the books that have gathered dust over the winter.

I am remaining positive in my thoughts.

Let me know in the comments what you are doing to maintain your mental health.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Team Tony Robbins.

LET’S TALK: OVERCOMING LONELINESS

If you are visiting through the website, please click on the post’s title to open this post in a separate window for a better experience and to comment.

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, I am not a doctor or therapist, I am just a fellow bipolar sufferer sharing my experiences in the hope they may help you. Please be aware that this blog post contains affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). At the end of each post, I will be recommending through links the books and other products I personally use to connect with my authentic self.

Overcoming Loneliness Is A Skill:

Learning the skill of overcoming loneliness with bipolar disorder is not easy but it not impossible either. Bipolar disorder symptoms enhance our feelings of loneliness but does not make those feelings a fact.

Realizing that overcoming loneliness is a skill, not another inherent gift that everyone got but I didn’t, really helped me. I hope that a little bit of knowledge helps you as well.

If overcoming loneliness is a skill, then it is something that is open for everyone to learn.  This means overcoming loneliness is a life skill we can add to our tool kit to help move us towards that “Ducky” life that we seek. The term “Adulting” perfectly describes learning the skills required to overcome loneliness. Overcoming Loneliness is a skill requiring maturity.

The Difference Between Loneliness and Boredom:

The feelings of loneliness and boredom are often confused but are actually two distinct feelings or states of mind. Combating boredom is a whole other subject to be covered at a later date. For this post let us define loneliness and boredom to get at the differences.

Loneliness defined: To feel lonely one does not have to alone. The feeling of loneliness is when one perceives that they lack social acceptance, or the quality or quantity of their social sphere is lacking. Loneliness is a perception or state of mind.

Boredom defined:  Being bored is expressing a lack of interest in one’s current activity or surroundings. Boredom can also be caused by the inability to concentrate on the activity or surroundings. Feeling bored can also result when leaving the chaos of mental illness or addiction. Boredom is more than a perception; boredom usually has a repairable cause.

The Main Blocks To Overcoming Loneliness:

Feeling lonely is caused by our perception of our social dynamic. The things that block us from overcoming loneliness are the things that stop us from changing our perception of the people, places, things or situations in our lives.

  1. Cognitive Distortions and mental blocks.
  2. Unstable moods.
  3. Anxiety.
  4. Trauma.
  5. Depression.
  6. Feeling misunderstood.

Some form of outside help is usually required to deal with these blocks to overcoming loneliness.

Tools To Overcome Loneliness:

  1. Understand that feeling of loneliness is just that, a feeling, It is not a fact. It is important to understand that this overwhelming feeling of loneliness that you have is generated by your perception of yourself and the people, places, things, and situations around you. A simple statement did more to help me overcome loneliness than anything else. “Attitudes are contagious, is yours worth catching?” I found that the more I worked to develop a positive attitude the less lonely I felt.
  2. Connect with a higher power. We are made up of body, mind, and spirit. Bipolar is more than just a mental disorder, it affects us physically and it is a spirit killer. Our spirit craves a connection with universal power. Developing our connection with that universal power greatly reduces loneliness.
  3. Reach out to others. Although the telephone seems to weigh a thousand pounds at times of extreme loneliness, it is one of the best things that we can do. You do not have to tell whoever you call or text that you are lonely. You can just talk to them about anything.
  4. Squash your negative thoughts.  Our negative thoughts are what hold us captive in loneliness. The only way to squash these thoughts is by taking positive action.
  5. Become willing to experience things and meet people. No one with bipolar is initially willing to try new experiences or meet people unless you are manic. If you are manic it is unlikely loneliness even enters your mind, Willingness can be worked up to by action,
  6. Don’t isolate. Like a hurt animal, our first instinct when we are down is to isolate. We have to overcome that instinct if we are ever to overcome loneliness. Our bipolar disorder does a number on our natural instincts. Making them the opposite of what they really should be.
  7. Build your self-esteem. Self-esteem building is an exercise, exactly like any physical exercise, Self-esteem is a part of the spirit that our bipolar disorder has killed. There are many resources that can help you build your self-esteem. I have included my favorites in the related products section,
  8. Join things, either online or in the real world. Most of us who suffer from bipolar disorder are not joiners. Bluntly, we have had too many bad experiences. My first positive joining experience was with an online bipolar group. I mostly hung back for the longest time and just read the posts, But even that gave me a sense of connection with people who shared a similar problem.
  9. Challenge the story you are telling yourself. As bipolar sufferers we not only have negative thoughts, but our whole life narrative is decidedly negative. Challenging that story you are telling and reframing it into something else allows you to change your view on life.
  10. Develop a sense of Wonderment. If you didn’t grasp the meaning of this statement, don’t feel bad I didn’t either in the beginning. The best way to develop this sense of wonderment is to start by being grateful. Gratitude for life is what leads to that sense of wonderment and awe.
  11. Create a vision and make a vision board. Creating a vision for your life is not setting goals. Creating a vision requires you to develop faith and believe that the unbelievable can happen in your life. My vision for my life is to create an unbreakable connection with my authentic self and help others to achieve that unbreakable connection. Along the way to have a “Ducky” Life. That is potentially unachievable but worth working towards every day.
  12. Think and speak positively. Everyone says this and they say it because it is true. Changing your thinking and speaking from negative to positive will change your life. Positive thinking does not mean negative things will not happen in your life. Or that you should think positively about negative things. That is pure bullshit. What positive thinking does is raise your awareness of options that were hidden before when negative things happen.
  13. Connect with your authentic self. I am writing a book on this subject so I will keep this short. This simply means that you begin recognizing and overcome the identity crisis that bipolar disorder created in your life.
  14. Disconnect from social media. This is not contradicting all the earlier statements about joining online groups or reaching out with your smartphone. It means to ignore and unfollow all the political and negative stuff. It means to disconnect from the competition for likes and follows. I have one rule for social media – Check your motives for being there.
  15. Learn that you can be yourself and people will still like you. This is something that I found difficult. Not everyone is going to like you, but surprisingly more people will like you if you are willing to be yourself. I spent years being the chameleon, all things to all people, trying to fit in. When I quit trying to fit in and just was myself, my social circle grew beyond my wildest dreams.

Loneliness is more of a perception or state of mind that creates a feeling than a feeling all on its own. To overcome loneliness, we must first change our perception of the people, places, things or situations in our lives. I hope these 15 things will give you some ideas on how to combat your own feelings of loneliness.

As we conclude this week’s blog post always remember our battle with bipolar disorder is with and in our minds. Our battle is with our illness not with other people, places, situations or other external things.  Our goal is to develop the self-discipline to take control of our emotions, minds, and lives.

The great inspirational speaker, Jim Rohn, said:” Work harder on yourself than anything else.”

I say,” Work hard on yourself and everything else falls into place like magic.”

Keep to the path, the hard one. The easy one does not go anywhere.

Related Products:

The Self-Esteem Workbook: 2nd Edition

https://amzn.to/33szvcJ

Self-Esteem: A Proven Program of Cognitive Techniques for Assessing, Improving, and Maintaining Your Self-Esteem.

https://amzn.to/39YFBEn

 

Subscribe to this blog by entering your email in the subscription box to the right of this post. In that way, you will be notified of all the new posts and happenings in 2020. Please comment below as I am very interested in your opinion.

BLOG OF THE WEEK:

Many other people blog on bipolar and related subjects. Mental wellness is all about knowledge and learning about ourselves. The more informed we are the easier our struggles may be. Each week I attach a blog written by someone else that I found interesting that may inform you as well.  This is another author’s work I am just attaching their blog for you.  I hope you enjoy this week’s blog created by Carol Borelli Originally featured in BPHope.

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